Ancestors of Myron Micheal Crandall

Notes


296. Joseph CHAMPLIN

http://noyes.rootsweb.com/wga18.html#I4824
Website based on "Genealogical Record of Some of the Noyes
Descendants of James, Nicholas and Peter Noyes", published in
1904 by Col. Henry E. Noyes.
Although this entire work is included in this database, nearly 700
additional sources have been added over the years with literally
thousands of citations to these various sources.

Champlin, Joseph (1709 - 1792) - male
b. 4 AUG 1709 in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island
d. 20 DEC 1792 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut
father: Champlin, Christopher(1684 - 1734)
mother: Denison, Elizabeth(1689 - 1749)

He served in the military frm 1734 thru the Revolution in King's
County, Rhode Island. (1) Joseph was appointed Ensign of the 4th
Westerly Company of the King's County Troop of Horse in May
1734, and Captain of the 1st Westerly Company, 3rd Regiment of
the King's County Militia, under his brother, Colonel Christopher
Champlin, in May 1747. He resigned this latter commission in
August 1747. In May 1755, Joseph was a Lieutenant Colonel in the
King's County Regiment that was sent to Albany, New York to
reinforce the army at Crown Point. He later commanded a force of
militia which prevented the British ship ROSE from landing at
Stonington Point, Connecticut. During the Revolution, he melted
his silver plate to aid the "cause" and his home at Westerly was
used as a refuge for patriots.

He has reference number 466 (Robert Champlin). He was Note:.
Both Rebecca (Chesebrough) Champlin and Mary (Noyes)
Champlin bore children named Joseph and Rebecca. Joseph, son
of Rebecca, died in 1764 after marrying and having at least one
child. Rebecca, daughter of Rebecca, died young.

Mary Noyes' mother (Mary Gallup) was a cousin of the Esther
Gallup who married Joseph Stanton (see biography of #541RC
Christopher Champlin). John Noyes and Mary Gallup were also:
..... grandparents of Nathaniel Noyes who married Temprance
Champlin (#1631RC) daughter of Joseph and Mary. ..... great
grandparents of Mercy Sisson who married Joseph Champlin
(#1634RC), son of Joseph and Mary.

Both of Joseph's wives were descendents of William Chesebrough.
He was the Grand-father of Rebecca, and the
Great-great-grand-father of Mary.

DAR: Joseph Champlin, (1709-92), commanded militia to prevent
the British ship, "Rose", landing at Stonington Point. He [p.18]
melted his silver plate to aid the cause, and his house at Westerly,
was a refuge for patriots driven from their homes.

Burial - AFT 20 DEC 1792; Stonington, New London, Connecticut;

Ancient Burial Ground. A slab of brown stone,
marking the resting place of Col. Joseph Champlin:
- In Memory of Col. Joseph Champlin who died Dec
20th 1792 in the 84th year of his age. Who died in a
full assurance of a glorious resurrection of the just.

spouse: Chesebrough, Rebecca (1711 - 1751)
- m. BEF 1733 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut

Marr Note

Based on birth of son, Joseph.

----------child: Champlin, Joseph (~1734 - )
spouse: Noyes, Mary (1725 - 1808)
- m. 8 FEB 1753 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut

Marr Note

Ceremony conducted by Nathaniel Elles at the First
Congregational Church in Stonington,
Connecticut.

The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says 1753.

----------child: Champlin, Charles Noyes (1754 - 1838)
----------child: Champlin, Temperance (1759 - )


297. Mary Noyes

http://noyes.rootsweb.com/wga92.html#I23915
Website based on "Genealogical Record of Some of the Noyes
Descendants of James, Nicholas and Peter Noyes", published in
1904 by Col. Henry E. Noyes.
Although this entire work is included in this database, nearly 700
additional sources have been added over the years with literally
thousands of citations to these various sources.

Noyes, Mary (1725 - 1808) - female
b. 14 AUG 1725 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut
d. 1808 in Windham, Windham, Connecticut
father: Noyes, John(1685 - 1751)
mother: Gallup, Mary(1695 - 1736)

Baptism - 26 SEP 1725;

Birt Note

(The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says 6 Sep 1725.)

spouse: Champlin, Joseph (1709 - 1792)
- m. 8 FEB 1753 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut

Marr Note

Ceremony conducted by Nathaniel Elles at the First
Congregational Church in Stonington,
Connecticut.

The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says 1753.

----------child: Champlin, Charles Noyes (1754 - 1838)
----------child: Champlin, Temperance (1759 - )


298. William SISSON

http://noyes.rootsweb.com/wga121.html#I31376
Website based on "Genealogical Record of Some of the Noyes
Descendants of James, Nicholas and Peter Noyes", published in
1904 by Col. Henry E. Noyes.
Although this entire work is included in this database, nearly 700
additional sources have been added over the years with literally
thousands of citations to these various sources.

Sisson, William (1744 - 1798) - male
b. 12 JUL 1744 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut
d. 15 OCT 1798
father: Sisson, William(~1715 - 1775)
mother: Mullins, Hannah(~1716 - )

Residence - BEF 1766; Preston, New London, Connecticut;

spouse: Noyes, Mercy (1748 - 1824)
- m. 10 APR 1766 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut

Marr Note

(New Haven Second Church. Married by Rev.
Joseph Fish.))

----------child: Sisson, Mercy (1771 - )


299. Mercy Noyes

http://noyes.rootsweb.com/wga94.html#I24459
Website based on "Genealogical Record of Some of the Noyes
Descendants of James, Nicholas and Peter Noyes", published in
1904 by Col. Henry E. Noyes.
Although this entire work is included in this database, nearly 700
additional sources have been added over the years with literally
thousands of citations to these various sources.

Noyes, Mercy (1748 - 1824) - female
b. 7 JAN 1747/48 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut
d. 8 DEC 1824
father: Noyes, John(1718 - 1800)
mother: Breed, Mercy(1727 - 1811)

[Brøderbund Family Archive #17, Ed. 1, Birth Records: United
States/Europe, Birth Records, AAI Birth Records Extraction, Date
of Import: Apr 27, 1996, Internal Ref. #1.17.1.24463.24]

Individual: Noyes, Mercy Birth date: Jan 7, 1748 Birth place: CT
CD# 100

spouse: Sisson, William (1744 - 1798)
- m. 10 APR 1766 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut

Marr Note

(New Haven Second Church. Married by Rev.
Joseph Fish.))

----------child: Sisson, Mercy (1771 - )


300. David RING Jr.

David Ring found in:

Marriage Index: Massachusetts, 1633-1850
Married: Nov 08, 1770 in: Newburyport, Essex Co., MA
Gender: M This record can be found at: Family History Library,
Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0890256.
Spouse name: Hadlock, Mary


301. Mary HADLOCK

Mary Hadlock found in:

Marriage Index: Massachusetts, 1633-1850
Married: Nov 08, 1770 in: Newburyport, Essex Co., MA
Gender: F This record can be found at: Family History Library,
Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0890256.
Spouse name: Ring, David


304. Joseph PARKER

http://www.gencircles.com/users/aakarma/1/data/12614
Ginni Schluetz aakarma@aol.com

Joseph PARKER 1 7 SmartMatches
Birth: Probably Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co, NJ 1
Death: Before. 21 Jun 1777 in Little Egg Harbor, Burlington Co, NJ 1
Sex: M
Father:
Mother:

Burial: Friends Burial Groung, Tuckerton, Ocean Co, NJ 1

Post New Message

Spouses & Children

Elizabeth ? (Wife)
1
Marriage: in Probably New Jersey

Hannah ANDREWS (Wife)
1
Marriage: 1721 in Little Egg Harbor, Burlington Co, NJ
Children:
Thomas PARKER
Elizabeth PARKER
Joseph PARKER
Peter PARKER
Samuel PARKER
Alice PARKER
Sarah PARKER
Hannah PARKER

Hannah OSBORN (Wife)
1
Marriage: 1739 in Little Egg Harbor, Burlington Co, NJ
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Sources
Title: ;Moser/Frank Family Tree - Glenda Frank Moser - joma2991@aol.com


306. Robert James

In a will, Robert James mentions his wife May

Amy/Amey is probably the youngest of at least eight children of
Robert JAMES and Mary:
Richard JAMES
Robert JAMES (m. Elizabeth)
Sarah JAMES (m. William McKNIGHT)
Lydia JAMES (m. Alexander LAIRD)
Thomas JAMES (m. Mary FITZRANDELL)
Rebecca JAMES (m. HERBERT)
Jerusha JAMES (m. William PARKER)


307. Mary

Amy/Amey is probably the youngest of at least eight children of
Robert JAMES and Mary:
Richard JAMES
Robert JAMES (m. Elizabeth)
Sarah JAMES (m. William McKNIGHT)
Lydia JAMES (m. Alexander LAIRD)
Thomas JAMES (m. Mary FITZRANDELL)
Rebecca JAMES (m. HERBERT)
Jerusha JAMES (m. William PARKER)


320. Samuel Moody

Copied from the book,"The John Wyatt Moody Family Past and Present",
Published by the Dr. Thomas Moody Family Organization Inc., 1985.
Pages 9, 20.
1. Moody Family Genealogy by Grant Moody (GS929.273M771m)
2. Va. land grants & patents (GSO29,308)
3. (was left blank)

____________
Notes from New FamilySearch

Anne Lound
Jeffrey Brian MoodyBirth: 1665 Charles City, Virginia, United States
Note: Anne Lound was the widow of Henry Hatcher who died 1677.
She was the administrator of his estate in 1678 court records. She
had married Hatcher in 1658 so certainly was not born about 1665.
There is dispute that she married Robert Moody who was married
to Miss Blanks. She likely married Samuel Moody
4 months ago (viewed on July 28, 2011)

Jeffrey Brian MoodyDeath: 1697 Charles City, Virginia, United States
Note: Anne Lound died sometime after Jul 1708 since she was
named in her father's will of that date. It was proven Nov 1708.
4 months ago (viewed on July 28, 2011)
-----------------
"He" is Francis Redford, stepfather of Samuel Moody, 2nd husband of Anne Lound Hatcher. Francis died 1693 in Henrico. "He appointed Lt. Col. John Farrar, Robert Bullington, and "son in law [stepson]" Samuel Moody overseers of his estate. His will left one mare to "grandson in law" Samuel Moody Jr. Anne and her husband evidently left Henrico County for no Moody appeared in the deed books of Henrico County for almost fifty years after Henry Lound's gift to his daughter with that name in 1678. Not until 1726 did Henry Moody witness a deed there. Another witness to this same deed was Anne's GRANDSON Samuel Hatcher [1770.1.2]. Thirty-six years later, in 1762, Henry Moody Sr. and Henry Moody Jr, witnessed Samuel Hatcher's will. Mary Lound, the daughter of Henry and Ann Lound, married Capt. Henry Batte [1762]. Virginians - The Family History of John W. Pritchett www.virginians.com
Copyright © 2001-2003"


324. Michael Cadet YOUNG

Former AFN 3GBT-XC for Michael Cadet YOUNG
This pedigree is fradulent: (sorry if Rootsweb colapses this)
/John YONGE b: ABT 1368 d: AFT 1394
/Thomas YONGE b: ABT 1394 d: 13 JAN 1427
/Thomas YONGE b: ABT 1420 d: ABT 1476
| \Joan WOTTON b: ABT 1398
/George YONGE b: ABT 1450
| \Isabell BURTON b: ABT 1424
/Hugh YONGE b: ABT 1476 d: BEF 1534
| \Johanna VACHELL b: ABT 1450
/John YONGE OR YOUNG b: ABT 1530 d: 1589
| \Mrs. Alice YONGE b: ABT 1490
/Robert YOUNG b: 1 JUL 1570
| \Joan WADHAM b: ABT 1536 d: AFT 1604
/Thomas YOUNG b: ABT 1590
| \Mrs. Robert YOUNG b: ABT 1568
/William YOUNG b: 7 JUL 1621
| \Anne YOUNG b: ABT 1594
/Francis YOUNG b: 18 JAN 1654 d: 13 AUG 1704
| \Mrs. Fraunces YOUNG b: ABT 1631
Michael Cadet YOUNG b: 1699 d: 1769
\Martha LE GROS b: 1677


Individual: I13946
http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ldshistorical&id=I13946

Janice McAlpine Email: mcalpage@cox.net wrote:

The noble lineage for Michael Cadet Young contained in Walter Jorgensen
Young's 1937 book, "The Young family of Bristol," is fraudulent. Walter
Young hired a genealogist to do the research, but only paid him
$500.00. (See, Young's book and the Walter Young letter in the Kennedy
Collection at UNC Chappel Hill.) Even in the 1930's $500.00 wasn't enough to
do even minimal research, so the genealogist found an unrelated, noble
Young family and made up the rest. Unfortunately, Walter Young did not
require documentation for his researcher's romantic story -- probably
because he wanted to believe that Michael Cadet Young had noble
ancestry.

There actually was a Sir Robert Young of Bristol, born July 1, 1570,
and knighted in 1604, as Walter Young's book says. However, Sir Robert
did not have a son Thomas. Sir Robert had three children alive in 1606.
They were daughter Elizabeth, and sons Nicholas and Perigrine Young.
These three children were mentioned by name in the 15 February 1606 will
of Sir Robert’s half-sister, Anne Strangeways Bridgman. P.C.C (60
Stafford) The will did not mention a Thomas and there are no other
documented children for Sir Robert Young. (“The Family of Yonge, or Young, of
Bristol, and on the Red Lodge,” J. Maclean., Transactions of the
Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, Vol. 15, pp. 227-245
(1890-91) <http://www.glos.ac.uk/bgas/tbgas/v015/bg015227.pdf>)

My husband is descended from Thomas Cadet Young and I have done
extensive research on this family. Even with all the resources available to me
in the 21st century, I have found minimal information about Sir Robert
Young and absolutely nothing about a son named Thomas.

Michael Cadet Young wasn't even a Young. He was a Cadet. His father
was François (Francis) Cadet b. abt 1670 Niort, Poitou, France, and his
mother was Marie Marthe LeGros, b. of Chastelerault, Poitou, France.
They were Huguenot refugees in London. Their son Michael Cadet was
baptized 28 Mar 1694, Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London,
England. (Colyer-Fergusson, T. C., The Registers of the French Church,
Threadneedle Street, London. Aberdeen, 1906, pp. 131.)
~Janice McAlpine

Prepared March 28, 2010, by Janice McAlpine, 2345 Oleander Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806. E-mail: mcalpage@cox.net

Michael Cadet Young: b. mid-April 1770, christened 29 April 1700, Saint Andrew’s Church, Enfield, London, England, died late December 1769 or early January 1770, Poplar Creek, St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick Co., Virginia. Michael married Temperance <Sadler> about 1730/1731, probably in Henrico County, Virginia, or in the part of Prince George County which became Brunswick County, Virginia.

Michael Cadet Young and his wife Temperance had at least 7 documented children:

A. Francis Cadet Young: born 25 October 1731, Bristol Parish, Prince George County, Virginia, d. December 31, 1794, Isle of Wight County, Virginia.
His birth is recorded in the Bristol Parish Register with Michael and Temperance Young listed as his parents. Francis married Elizabeth Bennett between 1752 and 1753 in Brunswick or Lunenburg County, Virginia. In a letter, Michael Cadet Young referred to Francis as his "eldest" son. (More in his separate file.)

B. Thomas Cadet Young b. 30 Sep 1732, St. Andrew’s Parish, Brunswick Co., Virginia, d. 3 or 9 Jul 1829, Iredell Co., North Carolina, buried Young Cemetery, Hunting Creek, Iredell Co., North Carolina. He married 1st Judith Johnson or Johnston and 2nd Lucy Ragsdale. His relationship to Michael Cadet Young is well documented through several letters from Michael Cadet Young to Thomas. (More in his separate file.)

C. Michael Cadet Young, Jr., b. abt 1734 , St. Andrew’s Parish, Brunswick Co., Virginia, d. before March 22, 1762, when his will was recorded. He married Lucy (last name unknown). His will mentions his parents and his wife Lucy. Various printed and internet sources state that his widow was Lucy Ragsdale, the second wife of Thomas Cadet Jr. I have not found anything to support this, but it is possible. (More in his separate file.)

D. LeGros Cadet Young, b. 1734/1740, probably Brunswick County, Virginia. He died February or March, 1787, at the Congarees, Camden District, Richland County, South Carolina. LeGros married Mary McGrew in South Carolina, date unknown. LeGros is mentioned as a son in at least one letter written by Michael Cadet Young. In addition, there are two letters written by LeGros Young to his brother Thomas. (More in his separate file.)

E. John Young, b. abt. 1745, Brunswick Co., Virginia, d. after 1820 in Tennessee. He was mentioned in a letter Michael Cadet Young wrote to Thomas Cadet Young dated February 1, 1767. John was also mentioned as “your brother John” in a February 1789 letter from James and Mary Gee to Thomas Cadet and Lucy Young. In addition, there is a December 10, 1792, letter written by John Young to Thomas Cadet Young in which he referred to Thomas as “Brother Thomas.” John Young married Elizabeth Andrews, daughter of Ephraim Andrews. Because their oldest surviving child, William, was born 25 March 1783, I assume John and Elizabeth married about 1781/1782. (More in his separate file.)

F. Martha Young, b. abt 1745/1750. She was mentioned in a lawsuit in Lunenburg County, Virginia. Michael Cadet Young also referred to “your sister” in two 1768 letters to Thomas Cadet Young. The sister was unmarried at the time the letters were written. Unfortunately, the name of the sister was not mentioned in the letters. A Martha Young married Samuel Bugg of Mecklenburg Co., Virginia, abt. 1769/1770. She was listed as Martha Bugg in his Dec. 24, 1775, will. I do not know if Martha Young Bugg was Michael Cadet Young’s daughter, but the possibility is worth exploring. (More in her separate file.)

G. William Young b. abt 1745-1750, St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, died after 1820, Campbell County, Virginia. William married Martha <Hubbard> about 1780. William was referred to as “brother Billey” in a letter dated December 12, 1792, from John Young to Thomas Cadet Young. William was on the1810 and 1820 census in Campbell Co., Virginia. Despite many mistaken, online, family trees, MCY’s son William was not the William Young who married Patience Sinclair. (More in his separate file and in the file for William Young and Patience Sinclair.)

Various family genealogies claim there were also sons named James, Henry and Benjamin, but no one has provided any documentation for them and they are not mentioned in the family letters I have seen. There was a James Young in Brunswick Co., who witnessed deeds in 1773 and 1790, but I have not been able to connect him to Michael Cadet Young. I have also found a James Young in Halifax Co., but I have nothing to connect him to MCY. For what it is worth, MCY had an uncle Jacque/James Cadet, so a son named James “fits.”

I have not found anything about a Benjamin Young. However, Michael Cadet Young did have a brother named Benjamin and might have named a son Benjamin after his brother.
* * * *

Michael Cadet Young was born Michael Cadet, probably shortly before his christening on 29 April 1700, at Saint Andrew’s Church, Enfield, London, England. The christening record reads: “Michael Cadett Christening: 29 April 1700 Saint Andrew, Enfield, London, England, parents: Francis Cadett and Mary.” (St. Andrew's Church, Enfield, Middlesex, registers in the London Metropolitan Archives, LDS film 0,585,397.)

As mentioned in the file for MCY's father, François Cadet, MCY's parents lost a number of children in infancy. As was common in those days, they “reused” important family names, giving subsequent children the same names as deceased siblings. As a result, François and Marie Cadet had two sons named Michael, one born in 1694 and one born in 1700. The christening record for the first Michael is abstracted as follows:

"Michael Cadet bpt.: 28 Mar 1694, Threadneedle Street French Huguenot Church, London, England. Parents: François Cadet and Marie, witnessed by Jacques Cadet and Jacques le Gros." (Colyer-Fergusson, T. C., The Registers of the French Church, Threadneedle Street, London, Aberdeen, 1906, p. 131, The Publications of the Huguenot Society of London, XVI; and 1600 - 1639 942.1 L1 B4H V.9 Book England, London, St. Bartholomew by the Exchange - Church records - Indexes Computer printout of London, Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, Lond., Eng LDS 6903811 Number of Fiche: 6; Originals of Registers at Guildhall Library London.)

An earlier researcher, Robert Young Clay, a long-time senior librarian at the Library of Virginia, found the 1694 christening record for Michael Cadet and assumed that he had the correct record for our Michael Cadet Young. Until April of 2008, I also assumed that it was the right record for our Michael Cadet Young. However, when I went through microfilm of original baptismal/christening records at the LDS Family History Library in Salt Lake City, I found the second record for Michael Cadet, son of François and Marie Marthe Cadet in the Parish registers of St. Andrew's Church, Enfield, London, Middlesex, England. For the reasons outlined in my file for François Cadet, I am confident that the second 1700 christening record is the correct one for our MCY.

Many online family trees list MCY as having been born 1684, St. James, Clerkenwell, London. This information comes from The Young Family of Bristol; Young, Walter Jorgensen; Fredericksburg, VA; 1937. The book also lists MCY as the son of Francis Young and Martha LeGros of Bristol, England with a long noble lineage for Francis. As with much in his book, Walter Young did not provide any documentation what-so-ever for this "information," and, as far as I can tell, there is none.

I actually went through the St. James, Clerkenwell records in the LDS library in 2008. Michael Cadet Young is not listed anywhere in the birth registers of St. James, Clerkenwell, even though those records exist for the period in question. (City of London Metropolitan Archives. London Generations database Saint James, Clerkenwell, Clerkenwell Green, Islington. Composite register: bapt Aug 1673 - Mar 1711, marr Aug 1670 - Mar 1692, bur Apr 1670 - Mar 1711: X097/356 - index X102/029; X102/030; X102/032;X10. Also available through LDS: London Metro. Archives call no.: P76/JSI/001-009, 023-029, 031, 064, 171-173, 175-182.)

I also researched the noble Young family of Bristol. Again there is absolutely nothing that even hints at the lineage in Walter Young's book. As it turns out, Walter 's book is mostly fiction based on the work of a hired genealogist, who was paid $500.00 to research the family in early Virginia and in England. (Walter J. Young letter, Kennedy Collection, UNC Chapel Hill.) Five hundred dollars wasn't much money even in the 1930's -- certainly not enough to do in depth research of any sort. In this case, the fellow didn't bother. For the most part, he invented a romantic tale of wealth and influence in Virginia and manufactured a connection between Michael Cadet Young and the noble Young family of Bristol to please the vanity his patron, Walter Jorgensen Young, who wanted noble ancestry. (See notes on Michael Cadet Young genealogy fraud for more information.) This wouldn't be much of a problem if the book weren't so widely available and cited as proof of MCY's life story and ancestry.

MCY’s real father, François Cadet, died December 28, 1712, in the Parish of St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, Surrey, England. François Cadet’s will was probated in 1713. (Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, 1 Leeds 531-545.) Jacque Cadet l’aine (a.k.a., James Cadet Sr.) and Michael LeGros testified when the will was probated. François Cadet left half of his modest estate to his wife Mary Martha and half to his three sons, Francis, Michael and Benjamin. Judging from the way the will was drafted, it appears that the three sons were unmarried and probably under-age in 1713. (See François Cadet’s file for the text of the will.)

At some point, Michael changed his French name, Cadet, to the English equivalent, “Young.” This was typical of Huguenots who assimilated fairly quickly into English society and Anglicized their family names. For example the name Dubois became Woods and Roussel became the English Russell. (Eglise Protestante Française de Londres <http://www.egliseprotestantelondres.org/histoire3.php> accessed October 20, 2008.)

It is not clear whether Michael Cadet Young changed his name from Cadet to Young in England or Virginia, but, starting about 1729 in Virginia, he seems to have had “second thoughts” about abandoning the name “Cadet” for the name “Young,” and started using both “Cadet” and “Young.” From that point on, most of his signatures were either M. Cadet Young or Michael Cadet Young. His sons, Francis, Thomas, Michael, and LeGros, all used the double surname, “Cadet Young,” while their father was alive, but all appear to have dropped the “Cadet” after their father died. (Robert Young Clay, Select Virginia Huguenot Resources in the Library of Virginia, Call Number: 32204, copy in my paper file.)

On 3 May 1739, Michael Cadet Young testified that it was “now Seventeen years since his “Importation from Great Brittain [sic]. . . .” (Brunswick County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, p. 241.) This means that he arrived in Virginia about 1722, when he was about age 22. On the same date (3 May 1739) and in the same court, a number of other individuals also testified about their importations. Some of the individuals who testified included John Stevens, John Scott, John Jackson, Cornelius Keith, Marmaduke Johnson, Henry Morris, William Eaton, Patrick Dempsey and Thomas Avent. (Brunswick County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, p. 241-243)

Michael Cadet Young and these same nine individuals were also listed in the "Virginia Patent Book", vol. 18:531 which showed a grant of acreage to Clement Reade dated 12 Mar 1739/40 for the "importation of 10 persons to dwell in Virginia whose names are John Stevens, John Scott, John Jackson, Cornelius Keith, Marmaduke Johnson, Michael Cadet Young, Henry Morris, William Eaton, Patrick Dempsey and Thomas Avent...."

Under Virginia law, an individual who paid the transportation costs of an immigrant to Virginia received 50 acres of land for each immigrant he imported into the colony. Although some individuals received land grants for importing family members, most grants were for the importation of indentured servants. See the following:

“Virginia planters who imported their labor were awarded 50 acres per indentured servant. The headright claims for the indentured servants listed the names of the individuals imported. Headrights were not always claimed immediately after immigration. There are instances in which several years elapsed between a person's entry into Virginia and the acquisition of a headright and sometimes even longer between then and the patenting of a tract of land.” (Library of Virginia, "Headrights," VA-NOTES, <http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/local/va4_headrights.htm> (accessed July 26, 2006.))

Many, if not most, immigrants came to the colonies as indentured servant. “In exchange for their service, the indentured servants received their passage paid from England, as well as food, clothing, and shelter once they arrived in the colonies. Some were even paid a salary.” (Ekirch, A. Roger. "Bound for America," in The William & Mary Quarterly, 3d. series, 42(April 1985): 167-83.)

Judging from the record, Michael Cadet Young arrived in Virginia in 1722, probably as an indentured servant. At a minimum, the grant of land to Clement Reade tells us that Michael Cadet Young did not pay his own passage and undoubtedly had to work off the cost of his transportation to Virginia. [Caveat: Robert Young Clay says that MCY paid his own passage, but Robert Young Clay did not discuss, and might not have been aware of, the record showing a grant of acreage to Clement Reade for importing Michael Cadet Young.]

Although many low-skilled laborers received no salary for their work and were poorly treated as indentured servants, skilled workers were often able to negotiate generous employment contracts before they left England. Some of these contracts included a grant of land at the end of the indenture or an agreement that the servant would be entitled to claim the importation headright. (David W. Galson; White Servitude in Colonial America: An Economic Analysis. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1981.)

Judging from the letters he left, Michael Cadet Young was well spoken and highly literate. Even if he arrived in Virginia as an indentured servant, as I suspect, I am sure he did not work in the fields. He probably was a clerk or a manager for a successful land owner.

As far as I can tell, there is no record of Michael Cadet Young from his arrival in 1722 to 1725 when he appeared as “Michel le June” or Le Jeune on the 1725 tithables lists in Henrico County, Virginia. (The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia, 1707-1750. Manakin Episcopal Church, Midlothian, Virginia, 1966. p. 256. ) That area of Henrico Co. was populated almost entirely by Huguenots and was essentially French-speaking in the 1720s. According to the Library of Virginia, it was fairly common to see English names show up on records from that place and period transformed into French approximations. The name "Young" would have been pronounced as "yoon" in the Huguenot community. As a result, the name Le Jeune would be an expected approximation for Young -- both in meaning and in pronunciation. Because Michel Le Jeune was not on any other Huguenot record for the period, it was reasonable to assume that Michel Le Jeune was actually Michael Young, who was on later records.

On May 2, 1726, Michael Cadet Young witnessed the will of Pierre Dutoit/Dutoy of Henrico County. He signed his name as M’l c Young. (Henrico County, Virginia. Miscellaneous Records (loose papers - original), Vol. 2 pp. 659-661.) Michael Cadet Young’s signature was very distinctive throughout his time in Virginia. He elongated the tail of the “g” in Young and ran it back under his full name adding curls and other flourishes. His signature on Pierre Dutoit/Dutoy’s 1726 will contained the fancy-work “g” that appeared on later documents, including his personal letters. As a result, there is no question that M’l c Young in 1726 was our Michael Cadet Young.

Pierre Dutoit was a Huguenot immigrant. (Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the Huguenot Society, 4th Ed., Finnell, Arthur Louis: 1995, p. 86.) The other witnesses to Pierre Dutoit’s will, Jean Jouany, Jean Piere Bilbou and Antoine Bennin, were also Huguenot. (List of Manakintowne Huguenot Settlers, published in The Huguenot, 1933, F. Batisse; Turff & Twigg: The French Lands, Volume I. Cabell, Priscilla Harriss. Richmond, VA: Carter Printing Company, 1988; The Virginia Genealogist - Volume 7: Jean Jouany, as American as John Jones.)

We know that Michael Cadet Young, Jean Pierre Bilbau and Antoinne Benin were employees or indentured servants in the Dutoit household because, Barbara Dutoy, widow of Pierre Dutoit, appeared on the 1726 tithable lists for King William Parish, Henrico County responsible for three tithes, Michel Yons, Jean Pierre Bilbau and Antoinne Benin. (The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia, 1707-1750, Manakin Episcopal Church, Midlothian, Virginia, 1966. p. 371. ) “White women were not tithable, but they occasionally appeared on the tax lists if, as widows or spinsters, they were responsible for paying the tithes of sons, slaves, or employees.” ("What Genealogists should know about 18th Century Virginia Law", John P. Alcock, November 17, 1999, Library of Virginia, <http://home.hiwaay.net/~woliver/Virginia_Law.html> accessed October 20, 2008.)

According to Robert Young Clay, “Yons is a fairly standard spelling for the name Young as pronounced with a French accent and the name so appears in many French Huguenot records.” (Select Virginia Huguenot Resources in the Library of Virginia, Call Number: 32204, copy in my paper file.) I also suspect the "Yons" may be a mistranscription of "Yong." In a number of records I looked at, the final letter in the name could easily have been transcribed as either and "s" or "y." In any event, because Michael Cadet Young witnessed Pierre Dutoit’s will in 1726, I am confident that “Michel Yons,” who was an employee or indentured servant in the widow Barbara Dutoy’s household, was our Michael Cadet Young .

On August 3, 1728, as “Michael Young,” our MCY witnessed a deed in Henrico County from Robert Mann to Thomas Mann. Other witnesses were Mark Moor and George Hunt Moore. (Henrico County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, pp. 195-196.)

On the 1st Monday in October, 1729, Michael witnessed a deed from Godfrey Fowler, Sr., and Godfrey Fowler, Jr., to William Dunavant in Henrico County. Other witnesses were Gilbert Morry and Philip Dunavant. His signature on the deed is “M˚ C. Young” and it bears the same flourish as his signature on the will of Pierre Dutoit. (Henrico County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, pp. 351-352)

Generally speaking, an indentured servant was prohibited from marrying or have children during the term of his indenture. (Ekirch, A. Roger. "Bound for America," The William & Mary Quarterly, 3d. series, 42 (April 1985): 167-83.) This may explain why MCY’s first son, Francis Cadet Young, was not born until 25 October 1731, nine years after MCY’s importation in 1722. (The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789, transcribed and published by Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne. Richmond, Va. 1898.) If Michael Cadet Young had been an indentured servant under a 7 year contract, his contract would have terminated in 1729. He could then have married in 1730 and had his first child in 1731.

Michael Cadet Young married Temperance <Sadler> about 1730/1731, probably in Henrico County, Virginia, or in the part of Prince George County, that became Brunswick County, Virginia. Temperance is the only wife of whom we have any record. Contrary to the information contained in The Young Family of Bristol, there is absolutely no evidence that Michael Cadet Young married before 1730, that his wife first wife was named Martha, or that Temperance was a second wife.

Michael Cadet Young's first child, Francis Cadet Young, was born in 1731. Temperance was listed as Francis' mother on his 1731 birth record. (The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789, transcribed and published by Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne. Richmond, Va. 1898.) In a Brunswick Co., Virginia, deed dated 25 November 1755, Temperance Young relinquished her dower rights in land transferred by Michael Cadet Young Sr. to Buckner Stith. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Order Book 5, p. 503.) Michael Cadet Young, Jr.'s, 1762 will listed Temperance as “my mother Temperance Young.” (Brunswick Co.,Virginia, Will Book 4, pt.2,198-(278) Will of Michael Young Jr. of St. Andrew's Parish 5 Feb. 1762, probate 22 March 1762.)

After the birth of Francis Cadet Young in 1731, the next record we have for Michael Cadet Young is in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 31 July 1734, when he witnessed a deed for George King. (Early Settlers of Mecklenburg Co, Virginia, Katherine B. Elliott, South Hill, VA (1965), p. 78.) However, it appears that MCY purchased land in Brunswick County from Thomas Wilson at some point prior to May 1732, because the deed is mentioned in 1735 as one of 52 that had not been recorded. (Brunswick Co. Virginia 1735, July 3. Land Record. Source Brunswick Order Book 1 page 99, entry of 52 deeds on 3 July 1735. Full text below.)

Brunswick Co., Virginia, was formed in 1720 from Prince George County, Virginia, but, because of the sparse population, a county government was not organized until 1732. <http://www.rootsweb.com/~vabrunsw/> According to Early Settlers of Mecklenburg Co, Virginia, “When Brunswick Co. was first cut from Prince George Co. in 1720, jurisdiction was to remain in the Court of Prince George Co. until a government for the county was organized. .... The first meeting of a court for Brunswick was not held until 2 May 1732. It is assumed that deeds, wills and other documents were recorded in Prince George Co. prior to the meeting of the first court in 1732. It is believed that some of these deeds recorded during this period were lost because of the entry below. At a later date, someone in the Clerk's Office wrote on the margin of this page '52 deeds apparently not recorded'."

A deed from Thomas Wilson to Michael Cadet Young was one of the 52 deeds not recorded: Brunswick Co. Virginia 1735, July 3. Land Record. Source Brunswick Order Book 1 page 99, entry of 52 deeds on 3 July 1735. "Thomas Wilson came into Court & presented & acknowledged deeds of lease & release to Mason Bishop, Michael C. Young, James Rigby, Richard Ramsey, Charles Golstone, John Fountain, Robert Andrews, Henry Beverly, John Merritt, Samuel Crawley, John Adcock, Henry Morris, Samuel Manning, John Blackstone, Richard York, Thomas Couch Jr., Benjamin Boing, Wm. Couch, James Couch, John Barnes, John Thomason, Richard Watts, Patrick Dorum, Seth Pettypool, Thomas Shelton, John Wilson, Philip Morgan, John Thomason Jr., James Dockery, Thomas Rawlins, William Douglas, James Arnold, Matthew Creed, Aaron Johnson, John Humphries, Henry Rottenberry Jr., Wm Fletcher, Thomas Robertson, Aaron Pinson, Joseph Coleson, Robert Alen, Francis Rayney, Joseph Dunman,Thomas Haney, John Mealey, Wm. Pennington, Henry Rottenbury Senr., and William Manning, which at the motion of the said Mason Bishop, Michael Cadet Young and all if the aforenamed persons they are ordered to be recorded."

Family lore says that Michael Cadet Young was a surveyor. I have not found any evidence of this, but early Virginia surveys were apparently discarded after a few years and are no longer in the records. (The Virginia Land Office (Research Notes Number 20) < http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/land/rn20_landoffice.htm> accessed October 20, 2008.)

We do know, however, that Michael Cadet Young was an attorney. According to The Cabells and their kin : a memorial volume of history, biography and genealogy, Alexander Brown, Boston and New York, Houghton, Mifflin & co (1895), pages: 46-47, Michael Cadet Young was qualified to practice law in Goochland Co., Virginia, in 1742. This is confirmed in Goochland County, Virginia, court order book 5, 1741-1745, by Ann Kicker Blomquist, Westminster, Md. : Heritage Books, 2007, at page 129:

[132] "At a court held for Goochland County the Third Tuesday in October being the 19 day of the month Anno Domini 1742. . . . Attorneys sworn Michael Cadet Young, William Battersby, Clermont Read & Gideon Marr Attornys take the oath appointed to be taken by the last Act of Assembly."

Permission to practice law in those days was granted by the individual county courts. I assume Michael Cadet Young was also a practicing attorney in other counties even though we have only found his admission to practice in Goochland. Michael Cadet Young witnessed a fair number of land transactions in Brunswick County. It is possible that he drafted the transfer documents and then witnessed the signings as part of his law practice.

In 1748, MCY was on the poll lists in Brunswick County: The William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 26, July 1917, pages 62 and 64, source Brunswick County, Virginia Deed Book 3 (1744-1749) Page 513, 515
Pole for Drury Stith--Michael Young [among a long list of others]
Pole for Sterling Clack--Michael Young [among a long list of others]

I assume MCY was listed twice because he owned at least two parcels of land.

The fact that none of MCY’s sons appeared on the poll lists in 1748 means that they were not eligible to vote in 1748. Only white men, age 21 and older, who owned property, or rented substantial farms, were permitted to vote in Colonial Virginia. (“Entailing Aristocracy in Colonial Virginia: ‘Ancient Feudal Restraints’ and Revolutionary Reform,” Holly Brewer, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 54, No. 2 (Apr., 1997), pp. 307-346)

In his 1937 book, The Young Family of Bristol, pages 5 -13, Walter J. Young portrayed Michael Cadet Young as part of the landed Virginia aristocracy with vast land holdings in Virginia and South Carolina. This is not accurate. Although Michael Cadet Young did own land, the extent of his holdings was greatly exaggerated by Walter Young.

For example, Walter Young said (at page 6) that Michael Cadet Young owned the “Middle Plantation” at the site of present-day Columbia, South Carolina. This is not accurate. South Carolina land records for the period 1720-1785 do exist, with the originals in Charleston, and microfilm copies in the South Carolina Department of Archives and History (Columbia). There is absolutely no record that Michael Cadet Young ever owned land in South Carolina. In addition, the land MCY was said to have owned -- the current site of Columbia, South Carolina -- was actually owned by the Taylor family, not MCY. (A History of Richland County South Carolina, Vol. 1, 1732-1805, Edwin L. Green.) There also are no land records of any significance for MCY’s son, LeGros Young, in South Carolina. In fact, LeGros Young was probably an employee of the Taylor family.

Walter Young also inflated Michael Cadet Young’s landholdings in Virginia by, among other things, listing property that MCY had patented or purchased with partners Drury Stith and Henry Morris as if the property had been solely owned by MCY. Without having a copy of their partnership agreement it is impossible to know what share Michael Cadet Young had in the property he acquired with Stith and Morris, but he certainly wasn’t the sole owner.

Walter Young was also wrong when he wrote that MCY “had 540 families of indentured servants working for him on his various properties. . . .” In addition, Walter was wrong when he wrote that as late as 1770, MCY had “54 tithes” on his properties in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County. (Young, pages 11 and 14.)

Giving Walter Young the benefit of the doubt, he apparently believed (and I quote) that “[a] tithe represents 10 families of servants . . . .” (Young, p. 11.) Hence the “540 families of indentures servants.” In reality, however, each tithe represented one taxable individual, not 10 families. Taxable individuals were white males ages 16 and over, including family members, employees and indentured servants; and male and female slaves ages 16 and over. (Sunlight on the Southside, Lists of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia 1748-1783, Landon C. Bell, Clearfield Company, Philadelphia, 1931, p. 49; see also, Colonial Tithables (Research Notes Number 17), Library of Virginia, <http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/tax/rn17_tithables.htm> accessed on October 20, 2008)

Unfortunately, it is more difficult to give Walter Young the benefit of the doubt on the “54 tithes.” As far as I can tell, no one has ever found a single tithes list for Michael Cadet Young. In addition, neither MCY nor his son Thomas Cadet Young was on the existing lists in Lunenburg County during the 1760s, including 1769. The 1770 and 1771 lists were lost long ago. (Landon Bell, 1931.) In other words, Walter Young had nothing on which to base his statement about the 54 tithes.

Son Thomas Cadet Young was on the Lunenburg lists from 1772 through 1776, but he was listed in the household of Roger Atkinson. Other documents show that Thomas was an overseer for Roger Atkinson. (Original document in the Kennedy Collection, UNC Chapel Hill, copy in paper file; and Sunlight on the Southside, Lists of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia 1748-1783, Landon C. Bell, Clearfield Company, Philadelphia, 1931, pages 296, 317, 327, 348, and 396.) As a result, the tithes for those years belonged to Roger Atkinson, not to the Cadet Young family. Despite this fact, Walter Young essentially took Roger Atkinson’s tithes over a multi-year period and attributed them to MCY. This becomes clear when you compare the figures Walter Young listed for MCY, “6 tithes in one parish, 11 in another, 11 in another and 26 in another” (Young at p. 11) with Roger Atkinson’s Lunenburg tithes -- 26 tithes for 1772 and 11 tithes each year for 1773, 1774, 1775, and 1776 -- on the Atkinson land managed by Thomas Cadet Young. (Bell, pages 296, 317, 327, 348, and 396.)

It is hard to know whether Walter Young’s statements about the tithes represented his own incompetence or whether they represented genealogy fraud on the part of his paid researcher. In either case, the statements about the tithes, and the other clearly inaccurate statements about MCY’s land ownership in South Carolina, bring into question the accuracy of everything Walter Young wrote about Michael Cadet Young’s land holdings.

What we do know from the record is that Michael Cadet Young owned at least 684 acres in Brunswick County by 26 Apr 1743, when he sold the property “where Young now lives” to J. Parish under a mortgage. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 2, 618(355) 26 Apr 1743.) It is reasonable to assume that MCY either owned other land at the time of the sale or purchased other land shortly thereafter because his property was mentioned in October of 1743, as a boundary-line for other property in Brunswick County. (Extracts From Drury Stith’s Entry Record Book. 1737-1770, Chiarito, Marian Dodson. p.10: 28 Oct 1743 Wm Macby enters 400 acres both sides Midway adj Mich. Youngs upper line. Transferred to James & Mathias Macby. )

I have records of land transactions from about 1736 through November of 1755 involving Michael Cadet Young -- sometimes in his individual capacity and sometimes in partnership with Stith and Morris. Rather than reciting the transactions here, I have listed them in rough chronological order later in these notes. There are clearly gaps in the records I have, but I suspect that the missing records reflect relatively modest land transactions.

The overall picture the land records present to me is one of a comfortable middleclass farmer with enough extra to engage in a bit of land speculation on the side. He certainly wasn’t a member of Virginia’s landed gentry. The more interesting question is, “What happened in the 1750’s to bankrupt Michael Cadet Young?”

We know from his personal letters that MCY was destitute in 1767, owning nothing except "a mare, saddle and cart" (1 February 1767, letter). His situation was also clear from his letter of December 1769 in which he chastised his son Thomas Cadet Young for failing to visit, stating that Thomas “ undoubtedly would have [visited] if I had an estate to leave behind me, but as I have nothing, I am dispised [sic] and forgot.” MCY also pleaded with Thomas to collect a small debt owed to him by Mr. Hudgins, “Inclosed [sic] is a letter to Mr. Hudgin which [I] beg you’ll give to him, it is to demand ten shillings of him at once for he owes me twenty more which is thirty in all and if it suits him to pay the whole I shall be glad to receive it, if not, ten will suffice for the present for I am in great need of that quantity of money and can’t tell what to do without it.” (Originals of letters in the Manuscripts Department Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Southern Historical Collection #3242 Mary Hunter Kennedy Papers (Kennedy Collection). Copies of originals in my paper file. Transcription below.)

I think something happened to MCY in the 1750s that wiped him out financially. We know from his letters that there was court action, probably in the mid-1750s that resulted in a judgment against him. In his February 1, 1767, letter, MCY wrote to Thomas, "I expect now a prosecution against me daily for a debt which I thought I had clear of and was accepted in Col. Stith’s hands, but contrary to that, I was served with a Scire Facias to renew the judgment." (Letter in Kennedy collection and paper file. Transcription below.)

A judgment debt expires after a certain period -- often 6 to 12 years -- unless a court action is brought to renew the judgment. In the old days, a scire facias was one way to renew a judgment. The fact that a scire facias was being brought against MCY in 1767 seems to indicate that a judgment had been entered against him in the 1750s and that the last payment on the judgment had been about 1755/1757. (I believe colonial Virginia used a 10 or 12 year period for judgments.) In addition, the underlying judgment probably was substantial, perhaps having to do with a land deal or mortgage, otherwise it would not have been worth the time and expense to file and prosecute the scire facias.

The last land transaction involving Michael Cadet Young as a seller or buyer seems to have been in 1755 when he transferred land to Buckner Stith. (General Index to Deeds. Vol. A. 1732-1881. Brunswick County, Virginia, 555: Buckner Stith From Michael Cadet Young & C Deed 1755 5-744). In November of 1755 Temperance Young released her dower rights in land transferred by MCY to Buckner Stith. This was probably in the same land. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Order Book 5, p. 503. 25 November 1755.)

Although it is not clear from the land records, this transfer to Buckner Stith may have been in satisfaction of the debt MCY mentioned in his 1767 letter. The debt MCY thought he was “clear of and was accepted in Col. Stith’s hands.”

In 1756, MCY also sold his personal belongings (Brunswick County Deed book 6, 56-(88), 58 (90), 28 Feb and l Mar 1756). This is highly unusual and is another indication that Michael Cadet Young was in dire financial straits by the mid-1750’s.

I don’t know where Michael Cadet Young was or what he did from 1755 to about 1760. I am fairly sure that MCY and Temperance had several children still living with them -- probably John, Martha, William, perhaps Michael Jr., and possibly others. Their oldest sons, Francis and Thomas, were in their mid-twenties and newly married. It is possible that MCY and family lived with one of them.

MCY’s son Thomas was working as a factor or manager for John Bennett in Lunenburg County as late as 1767 (letter in Kennedy Collection and paper file), so it is reasonable to believe that Michael Cadet Young might have worked in a similar capacity for a large landowner in the area. Despite his financial difficulties, MCY was highly literate and undoubtedly an experience manager. As a factor or plantation manager, MCY would have been provided descent living quarters for his family.

In 1760, MCY’s son, Michael Cadet Young, Jr., bought a small farm “adjoining Little Creek” in Brunswick County:

Brunswick County, Virginia, Deed Book 6, page 505: Indenture made the 25th day of April, 1760, between Samuel Wiggen and Michal Young, Junior, for 16 pounds, conveying 150 acres, adjoining Little Creek and land of James Harwill, and being same land granted to Marmaduke Daniel on May 19, 1757. Witnesses were Allen Love, Randall Bracey, and Thomas Singleton. Indenture proved by the oaths of the witnesses in Court on April 28, 1760.

It appears that MCY and Temperance moved in with Michael Cadet Jr. and his wife Lucy about 1760, because Michael Cadet Young, Jr.’s, 1762 will left his parents and wife Lucy a life estate in the property. (Brunswick Co., Virginia, Will Book 4, pt.2 198-(278) Will of Michaiel [sic] Young Jr. of St. Andrew's Parish 5 Feb. 1762, probate 22 March 1762.) This is probably where MCY spent the last 9 years of his life.

On 30 Nov 1760, MCY witnessed the will of Amy Gilliam and proved it in court on 28 March 1763. (Brunswick Will Book 4, pt.2, 227 (323) Will of Amy Gilliam 30 Nov 1760, 28 March 1763. Witnessed by Mychaile Cadle [sic] Young, Mary Vaughn, William Vaughn. Proved by Michaiel Cadle [sic] Young , 28 March 1763.) Amy Gilliam appears to have been the widow of James Gilliam. I don’t know what, if any, connection the Gilliam’s had to MCY.

On September 9, 1761, MCY witnessed a deed between Richard Vaughan, the Younger, and John Westmoreland (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 7, Page 16.)

Michael and two of his sons were on the Poll Lists in Brunswick Co. for 1768:

Brunswick Co., Deed Book 9, pp. 279-83: Poll 2 December 1768.
Young Francis
Young Michael Cadet
Young Thomas

The last dated MCY letter in the Kennedy Collection is from December 22, 1769. In that letter MCY wrote to his son Thomas about MCY’s impending death, “I feel the lamp of life decaying every day; my breath grows shorter and shorter, so that I can’t sport myself the least as can be, not even walk but with great difficulty for the want of breath.” There is another undated letter, clearly from the same period, and, I believe, written shortly after the December 22, 1769, letter. In this final letter, MCY asks Thomas to promise “that you will take good care of your poor indigent mother and suffer her not to want in her old age. . . .” (Letters in Kennedy Collection and my paper file. Transcription below.)

When he died in late December 1769 or perhaps early January 1770, Michael Cadet Young had no estate to probate. According to The Young Family of Bristol, this was because MCY had transferred his “vast estate” to his sons, Michael Jr., Thomas, LeGros, and Francis, before his death, however, this is not supported by the record. There is nothing to show that MCY ever transferred anything to his sons and none of them was especially well off during the years before MCY’s death.

For example, Michael Cadet Young, Jr., owned 150 acres when he died in 1762. This was land he had purchased in 1760. (Brunswick Co., Virginia, Will Book 4, pt.2 198-(278); and Brunswick County, Virginia, Deed Book 6, page 505) Thomas Cadet Young was employed as a factor for John Bennett in 1769 and owned a total of 350 acres and one slave. (Kennedy Collection: undated MCY letter, 1769 will of Thomas Cadet Young, copies in my paper file.) Thomas’ land was purchased in November, 1761, from John Pilkinton. (Brunswick County Deed Book 7, Page 47.) LeGros Young left a minimal estate when he died intestate in 1787. (Camden District, S.C., wills and administration, 1781-1787, Brent Holcomb, Elmer Parker, 1978, p. 67: Young, LeGros At. 76, Pck 2712.) Francis Cadet Young’s first land purchase was 50 acres from his father-in-law James Bennett in February of 1761 and his subsequent land purchases were modest and do not appear to have had any connection with his father. (Brunswick County Deed Book 6, page 619; Deed Book 4, Page 205; Deed Book 7, Page 109; and Deed Book 8 page 125.)

MCY’s wife, Temperance survived him and was alive as late as February of 1782 when she was mentioned in a letter from LeGros Young to his brother Thomas Cadet Young (see file for Temperance).

MCY Land Records:
The following are land records in which Michael Cadet Young was listed as something other than a witness. In some he was a seller, in others a purchaser and in some his land was mentioned to locate identify boundary lines of the property being transferred:

Brunswick Co Book 1 p. 306: William Toms of Brunswick Co., to Michael Cadet Young of the same County . . . 125 acres . . . on the north side of the Roanoke River . . . adjoining Thomas Robertson & Philip Morgan . . . part of a patent for 534 acres granted to John Davis. Witness John Parker, Henry Crackendale, James Riggby /s/ William Toms. Signed and recorded 3 March 1736. (Source: Early settlers of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, p. 83.)

Virginia Patent Book No. 18, p. 986: Michael Cadet Young 171acres Brunswick Co. S side Sturgeon Run and on both sides Hall's Br. adj. Embry & Davis 1 June 1741 (Cavaliers & Pioneers, Vol. IV p. 44; and Brunswick Deeds, citing VPB 19:986 <http://users.rcn.com/deeds/Brunswck.txt>; Copy of the handwritten patent with detailed land description in my paper file.)

The image of the above patent is online at Library of Virginia Archives:
http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=986&last=&g_p=P19&collection=LO
Patent
Young, Michael C.
1 June 1741.
Location: Brunswick County.
Description: 171 acres on the south side of Sturgeon Run and on both sides of Hall’s Branch.
Source: Land Office Patents No. 19, 1739-1741, p. 986 (Reel 17).Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.
System Number 000846710

Brunswick Co. Deed Book 2, 618 (355) MC Young sold to J. Parish 684 acres, where Young now lives. Mortgage for 684 acres. 26 Apr 1743.

Extracts From Drury Stith’s Entry Record Book. 1737-1770, Marian Dodson Chiarito. “This book list land entries in the western portion of the original Brunswick County - what is today Halifax, Pittsylvania, Henry, Franklin & Patrick. These counties were formed from Lunenburg which was separated from Brunswick in 1746. These are entries - statement of intentions to purchase.”

p.10 28 Oct 1743 Wm Macby enters 400 acres both sides Midway adj Mich. Youngs upper line. Transferred to James & Mathias Macby.

p.34 27 Nov 1746 William Macby entered 200 acres of Land West side of Birches Creek joyning Michael Cadet Young and James & Matthias Macby, to be alter'd. Survd. [See first entry for William Macby]

Virginia Patent Book 28, p. 230: 1 October 1747 Drury Stith, Henry Morris & Michael Cadet Young 412 acs. Brunswick Co. on the Ridge bet. Little Bluestone and the Middle Fork. beg. near a pond. £2 5 shillings. (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. V, p 321.)

The image of the above patent is online at Library of Virginia Archives:
http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=230&last=&g_p=P28&collection=LO
Patent
Grantee(s): Stith, Drury, Morris, Henry and Young, Michael Cadit.
1 October 1747.
Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.
Location: Brunswick County.
Description: 412 acres.
Source: Land Office Patents No. 28, 1746-1749 (v.1 & 2 p.1-730), p. 230 (Reel 26).
System Number 000846711

Virginia Patent Book 28, p. 233: 1 October 1747 Drury Stith, Henry Morris & Michael Cadet Young 637 acs. Brunswick Co. on both sides of Bluestone Cr. just above the Middle Fork, adj. Byrd £3 5 shillings. (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. V, p 322.)

The image of the above patent is online at Library of Virginia Archives:
http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=233&last=&g_p=P28&collection=LO
Patent
Young, Michael Cadit.
1 October 1747.
Grantee(s): Stith, Drury, Morris, Henry and Young, Michael Cadit.
Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.
Description: 637 acres.
Source: Land Office Patents No. 28, 1746-1749 (v.1 & 2 p.1-730), p. 233 (Reel 26).
System Number 000846712

On 10 Nov 1748 the Council of VA ordered that John Stovall have a patent on Couch's Creek, Lunenburg Co. Virginia, as assignee of Nicholas [sic Michael??] Cadet Young. [My note: the transcription says Nicholas, but I think it is a misreading of Michael.] (Transcription at <http://www.sylcox.com/ged/html/notes.html>)

Lunenburg Co. VA Deeds 1746-1752 Pg. 28. (463) Sep 26, 1749 from Drury Stith, Henry Morris, & Michael Cadet Young of Brunswick Co and Parish of St. Andrew to John Thompson of L and Parish of Cumberland, 44L about 637 acres on both sides of Blewstone Creek being the same land that was formerly patented to Stith, Morris, & Young on Oct 1, 1747, & bounded by Byrd's line. S/Drury Stith, Henry Morris, M. Cadet Young. Wit. James Parrish, John O Murphey, John (+) Humphris. Recor. Oct 3, 1749.

VA Land Patent
5 Jul 1751 Patent Book 30, p.479-80
To William Macbee, 800 acres in county of Lunenburgh on both sides Medway River [later Birches Creek]. Begin Umphrey's corner beech on Michael Cadet Young's line (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. VI, p 65.)

The image of the above patent is online at Library of Virginia Archives:
http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=479&last=&g_p=P30&collection=LO
Patent
Macbee, William.
5 July 1751.
Location: Lunenburg County.
Description: 800 acres on both sides of Medway River, adjoining Michael, C. Youngs land.
Source: Land Office Patents No. 30, 1750-1752, p. 479 (Reel 28). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.
System Number 000787782

Indenture made the 1st day of April, 1752, between Thomas Sadler and Rebecca, his wife, and Buckner Stith for 40 pounds, conveying 118 acres on South side of Sturgeon Run and part of a larger tract granted to Michael Cadet Young by Letters of Patent bearing date of June 1, 1741 and conveyed by M. Cadet Young to Thomas Sadler by Deed of Gift. Witnesses were Francis Cadet Young, Richard Undson and Michael Cadet Young, Jr. Presented in Court on June 21, 1752. Deed Book 5, page 233.

Virginia Patent Book 30, p. 346: 6 August 1753 Drury Stith, Henry Morris & Michael Cadet Young 3,070 acs. Lunenburg Co. on both sides of Grassey Cr. on White Lick Br. and Beaver Pound Br. £15 5 shillings. (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. VI, p 85.)

The image of the above patent is online at Library of Virginia Archives:
http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=346&last=&g_p=P31&collection=LO
Patent
Grantee(s): Stith, Drury; Morris, Henry; and Young, Michael Cadet.
6 August 1753.
Location: Lunenburg County.
Description: 3070 acres on both sides of Grassey Creek.
Source: Land Office Patents No. 31, 1751-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-751), p. 346 (Reel 29).
Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.
System Number 000827190

Lunenburg Co. Deed Book 4-86: Daniel Mackneel purchased 200 acres on 26 Oct 1753 from Drury Stith, Henry Morris and Michael Cadet Young of Brunswick Co.

Indenture made the 17th day of June, 1755, between Michael Cadet Young and Theophilus Feild of Prince George County and Buckner Stith, for 20 pounds, conveying 53 acres on South side of Hals Branch. Witnesses were Thomas Cadet Young, Nicholas Edmunds, and Timothy Ward. Presented in Court on June 24, 1755. Deed Book 5, page 744, Brunswick County, Virginia.

General Index to Deeds. Vol. A. 1732-1881. Brunswick County, Virginia
555 Buckner Stith Fr Michael Cadet Young &C Deed 1755 5-744

"Record of acknowlegment by T. Field (spelled ffeild here) that he has received from Buckner Stith an assignment of George and Robert Austin's n (?) bond to him dated 9 April, 1755, whereon is due 63 pounds, 17s and 1d. which said money is received on a mortgage made ...... since contracted by Michael Cadet Young to Theophilus Field the 27 March, 1753. On a tract of land in Brunswick County containing 882 acres ... dated 17 June, 1755, and recorded 24 June, 1755." (<stith.packent.com/aunt_estie/letters/19610221.html>)

Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Order Book 5, p. 503. 25 November 1755, Temperance Young relinquished her dower rights in land transferred by Michael Cadet Young Sr. to Buckner Stith.

* * * *
Other Brunswick County Records Concerning MCY: Starting in about 1735, Michael Cadet Young witnessed a number of deeds and wills and was mentioned in other documents:

Early Settlers of Mecklenburg Co, Virginia,
p. 78: Michael Cadet Young witnessed George King deed 31 July 1734

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA - WILL AND DEED BOOK 1
P. 178-180 June 1735; William Toms of St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick County, to John Clements of same; lease and release; 277 acres on the north side of Roanoke River; on Gabriel Harrison's line on the river; to Philip Morgan's line. Wit: Michael Cadet Young, Nicholas Edmunds. 5 June 1735; acknowledged by William Toms.

Brunswick Co, VA, Deed Book/Will Book :Thomas Couch, Sr of St Andrews Parish to Thomas Couch, Jr of same. 1 Sept 1736. L5. 150 acres on the south side of Couches Branch, joining William Stroud, Thomas Lloyd, Thomas Couch, & included sd Thomas Couch, Jr's plantation. Wit: M. Cadet Young, John Stogganor (?). Proved 7 Oct 1736. Drury Stith CC Possession and seizin granted Thomas Couch Jr. 7 Oct. 1736. Ack. by Thomas Couch Senr.

Brunswick Deed Book/Will Book 1: Thomas (T) jackson of Brunswick Co to his son John Jackson. Deed of gift. 130 acres on the east side of Plantation Branch, joining Henry Hunt, John Duke, Ambrose Jackson, John Duke. Wit: M. Cadet Young, Thomas (W) Wilkinson. Proved 2 (torn) 1737. Drury Stith CC.

Deed Book/Will Book 1, Brunswick Co, VA: Ralph jackson & his wife Hannah (H) of Brunswick Co to William Gunn of same. 2 Mar 1737. L50. 2 tracts: 1 of 200 acres which had been a patent to said Ralph Jackson dated 7 July 1726, on the north side of Maherrin River, Bareskin Gutt; 1 of 100 acres which had been a patent to said Ralph Jackson dated 7 July 1726, on the south side of Maherrin River, joining Turkey Island. Wit: Michael Cadet Young, *John Watson. Proved 2 Mar 1737. Drury Stith CC.

Indenture made the 7th day of April, 1737, between William Walters of St. Andrews Parish and Drury Stith, Gentleman, for 20 pounds, conveying 240 acres on South side of Maherrin River. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young, Willm. Jones, and Canduis Cargill.(might that be Cornelius?? Cargill?) Presented in Court and acknowledged on April 7, 1737. Deeds and Wills Book 1, page 313.

Brunswick County, VA Deed Book/Will Book 1: Hicks Jones of Brunswick to William Avriss of same. 1 Jun 1737. L20 sterling. AVRISS' release from JONES 200 acres on the south side of Hickory Run (but excepting 1 acre for the use of the mill). Wit: M. Cadet Young, Henry Jones, John Bolling. Proved 7 Jun 1737. Drury Stith CC

Brunswick Deed Book 2: Thomas (T) Jackson of Brunswick Co to his son William Jackson. Deed of gift. 6 Par 1738. 125 acres on the west side of Reedy Creek, joining Ambrose Jackson, Tatum. Wit: M. Cadet Young, John (B) Brooks, Jr. Prove 6 Apr 1738. Drury Stith CC.

Deed Book 1, page 526: Indenture made the 7th day of June, 1738, between Thomas Loyd, Sr., of St. Andrews Parish and Drury Stith, Gentleman, for 50 pounds, conveying 283 acres on lower side of Sturgeon Run on the South side of Nottoway River. Witnesses were James Parrish and M. Cadet Young. Presented in Court and acknowledged on June 7,1739.

Deed Book/Will Book 1, Brunswick Co, VA: William Gunn of St Andrews Parish in Brunswick Co to John Douglass of same. 6 Jul 1738. L10 VA. 100 acres which Ralph Jackson had conveyed to said Gunn, on the south side of Meherrin River, joining Turkey Island. Wit: John Butler, M. Cadet Young. Proved 6 Jul 1738. Probate indicates that Margarett the wife of William Gunn was examined. Drury Stith CC.

Deed Book/Will Book 1, Brunswick Co, VA: William Gunn of St Andrews Parish in Brunswick Co to Samuel Chamberlain of same. 6 June 1738. L11 VA. 200 acres which *Ralph Jackson had conveyed to said Gunn, on the north side of Meherrin River. Wit: John Butler, M. Cadet Young. Proved 6 Jul 1738. Probate indicates that Margerett the will of William Gunn was examined. Drury Stith CC."

Brunswick Co., VA, WB/DB 1, p. 471, 6 Apr 1739: William Carrill of NC to Edward Brodnax of Charles City Co. 5 shilings sterling. A 1-year lease for 200 acres which was part of a 570 acre patent to Hannah Raines dated 28 Sep 1732 & devised to sd William Carrill by the will of John Raines. Wit: Drury Stith, M. Cadet Young, James Parrish, Peter Brewer, Clemt Read. Proved 4 May 1739.

Brunswick Co, VA, Deed Book/Will Book : Thomas Couch, Sr & Thomas couch, Jr to Drury Stith gent. 2 Aug 1739. 566 acres as by patent to sd Thomas Couch, Sr dated 1722 (150 acres had already been conveyed by sd Thomas Couch, Sr to sd Thomas Couch, Jr 1 Sep 1726), onPine Lick Branch, joining John Stroud, Thomas Lloyd, Talbott Morris. Wit: M. Cadet Young, Williams Edwards. Proved 2 Aug 1739. Drury Stith CC

Brunswick County, Virginia Will Book 2, pages 14, 15: Will of Richard Massey 1 Feb 1739 Proven 5 June 1740 Witnesses: Michael Cadet Young Phillip P. Jones Seth Petty Poole proved by The oaths of Michael Cadet Young, Phillip Jones and Seth Petty Poole.

Deed Book 1, page 530: Indenture made the 2nd day of August, 1739, between Thomas Couch, Sr., Thomas Couch, Jr., and Drury Stith, Gentleman, for 30 pounds, conveying 566 acres on the Pine Lick Branch (John Stroud's corner, Thomas Lloyd's line, Talbott's line, Morris's corner), same being granted to the said Thomas Couch, Sr., by Letters of Patent at Williamsburgh, 1720. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young and William Edwards. Presented in Court and acknowledged on August 2, 1739.

Brunswick County VA Deeds, Deed Book 1, page 530: Indenture made the 2nd day of August, 1739, between Thomas Couch, Sr., Thomas Couch, Jr., and Drury Stith, Gentleman, for 30 pounds, conveying 566 acres on the Pine Lick Branch (John Stroud's corner, Thomas Lloyd's line, Talbott's line, Morris's corner), same being granted to the said Thomas Couch, Sr., by Letters of Patent at Williamsburgh, 1720. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young and William Edwards. Presented in Court and acknowledged on August 2, 1739.

Deed Book 2, page 51: Indenture made the 5th day of March, 1740, between John Stroud, of St. Andrews Parish, Planter, and Drury Stith, Gent. of St. Andrews Parish, for 20 pounds, conveying 196 acres on North side of Sturgeon Run, being part of a larger tract formerly granted to: John Stroud, Sr., and bequeathed to his son, John Stroud. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young, Ralph Dunkley, and Matthew Mayo. Acknowledged in Court on March 5, 1740, at which time, Jane Stroud, wife of the said John Stroud, appeared and relinquished her dower interest..

Deed Book/Will Book 1, Brunswick Co, VA: William Gunn of St Andrews Parish in Brunswick Co to William Maclin. 6 June 1740. Said Maclin had undertaken to pay L43s15p6 to Francis Epes. Thus the sale of Negro man Will, woman Shelah, woman Belinda. Wit: Sterling Clack, Michael Cadet Young, Clement Read. Proved 3 July 1740. Ster. Clack CC.

Deed Book 2, page ___: Indenture made the 7th day of August, 1740, between John Cooke and Nathaniel Cooke and Samuel Harwell, for 20 pounds, conveying 286 acre tract on South side of Stony Hill Run. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young and John Stroud. Acknowledged in Court on August 7, 1740.

Deed Book 2, page 125: Indenture (Mortgage) made the 27th day of June, 1741, between William Stroud, Planter, and Drury Stith, Gent., conveying 196;acres on both sides of Sturgeon Run and 392 acres which was surveyed for John Stroud, dec'd. in 1729, to secure payment of 12 pounds, 12 shillings and 2 pence. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young, Wm. Maclin, and Thomas Sadler. Acknowledged in Court on December 3, 1741.

Deed Book 2, page 236: Indenture made the 28th day of February, 1742, between Cornelius Keith and Thomas Twitty, for 25 pounds, conveying 100 acres, being same land in that certain deed of gift from Robert Hix,, Sr., late of Brunswick County, dec'd. to the said Cornelius Keith, dated the 2nd day of May, 1734, and the same being part of a larger tract of land granted to the said Robert Hix in his lifetime. Witnesses were Clement Read, M. Cadet Young, and Thomas Lanier. Acknowledged in Court on March 3, 1742, at which time Elizabeth, wife of the said Cornelius Keith, appeared and relinquished her dower interest.

DEED BOOK 2, 543-(304) Hollum(X) Sturdivant and his wife, Elizabeth(X) of Surry Co. John rottenburry & his wife, susanna(X) of same, Henry(H) Ledbetter & his wife Edeth(L) of Brunswick, Richard(R) Fox & his wife Hannah, alias Joannah(X), and Sarah Mabry to George Mabry of St. Andrews Parish in Brunswick Co. 2 December 1742 £30 280 acres(which had been a patent to John Williamson dated 18 February 1722 & at his death fell to his daughters, Elizabeth Sturdevant, Susanna Rottenburry,
Edith Ledbetter, Hannah Fox, and Sarah Mabry) on the south side of Nottoway River, joining the north side of Rocky Run. Wit: M Cadet Young, Moses Dunkley. Proved 2 December 1742. Ster. Clack CC

[??] On 2 Sep 1744, William Gent of Edgecombe Co., NC sold his remaining land in Brunswick Co., VA to William Irby (Brunswick from Prince George, Isle of Wight and Surry in 1720). Mary, wife of William, relinquished her right of dowry. M. Cadet Young, Moses Dunkrey and Charles King were witnesses.

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 4 January 1745, M. Cadet Young, Thomas Brooks, and John Maclin witnessed the Will of Mary Maclin. The will was prove 5 February 1746 by the testimony of the witnesses. (Kinfolks, William C. Harllee, New Orleans, Searcy & Pfaff (1934) at p. 2636)

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA - WILL BOOK 2, p. 129: Mary Maclin proved Feb. 5, 1746 Witnesses: John Maclin , Thomas Brooke , M. Cadet Young.

Brunswick County, Virginia Deed Book 3 Page 174: Indenture made 3 March 1745/6 between William Tilman of Brunswick County and George Tilman of same, 5 Shillings, South side of Waqua Creek, 617a as in Certain Letters Patent dated 28 September 1732 whereby the said Land was granted to the said William Tilman. Signed William Tillman. Witnesses: Lewis Parham, William Irby, M. Cadet Young. Court April 3, 1746, Indenture acknowledged by Wm. Tillman.
Deed Book 3, Page 175: Indenture made 3 April 1746 between George Tillman of Brunswick County and William Tillman of same, for Love and Affection and 5 Shillings, on Stoney Hill Run, 512a, it being 308a which was granted to Roger Tillman by Patent dated 7 July 1726 and then acknowledged to the said George Tillman at a court held for Brunswick 6 December 1739 and rest of land was granted to the said George Tillman by Pattent dated 22 September 1739, and the said William Tillman doth agree that the said George Tillman shall quietly & peaceably have hold use occupy possess and enjoy the manner plantation with all the Lands & premises thereto belonging during his Natural Life & if it shall so Happen that Mary who is now Wife to the said George Tillman shall survive her said Husband she is to have the same Land & Plantation also agreed to by the said George Tillman & William Tillman. Signed George Tillman and William Tillman. Witnesses: Lewis Parham, William Irby, M. Cadet Young. Court April 3, 1746, Indenture acknowledged by George Tillman.

Deed Book 3, page 182: Indenture made the 1st day of May, 1746 (MDCCXXVI), between Drury Stith and James Parish and William Maclin, for 20 pounds, conveying 224 acres on South side of Maherrin River, tract formerly granted to Thomas Alister by Letters of Patent bearing date of September 28, 1728 (MDCCXXVII) and conveyed from the said Thomas Alister to William Walters to Drury Stith, Sr. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young and Moses Dunkley. Acknowledged in Court by Drury Stith on May 1, 1746.
Deed Book 3, Page 182: Indenture made the 1st day of May, 1746 between Drury Stith of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and James Parish and William Maclin, for 20 pounds, conveying 224 acres on South of same parish and County, South side of Maherrin River, 224a, it being the same tract of land formerly granted to Thomas Alister by Letters Patent dated 28 September 1728 and by the said Alister conveyed to William Talters & by him conveyed to Drury Stith Senr, dated 1 May 1746. Signed Drury Stith. Witnesses: M. Cadet Young, Moses Dunkley. Court May 1, 1746, Deed acknowledged by Drury Stith.

Deed Book 3, page 537: Indenture made the 4th day of January, 1748, between Robert Gee and Nathaniel Harrison, for 37 pounds and 10 shillings, conveying 413 acres, adjoining land of Lanier, Read, Harwell and Lloyd, and being part of land granted to the said Robert Gee by Letters of Patent bearing date of January 12, 1746 (MDCCXXXVI). Witnesses were M. Cadet Young, Hervy [Henry?] Morris, and William Morris. Acknowledged in Court on March 2, 1748.

Deed Book 3, Page 565: John Lloyd of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, Planter for £8-1 Shillings paid by Thomas Lloyd Junr. of same, Planter, goods and chattels, dated 18 March 1748. Signed John Lloyd (bhm). Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Thomas Sadler, William Stroud Senr (bhm). Inventory of goods &; Chattels to Thomas Lloyd Junr.on 18 March 1748. Signed John Lloyd. Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Thomas Sadler, William Stroud Senr. (bhm). Court June 1, 1749. Bill of Sale and Inventory proved by oath of Michael Cadet Young.

Deed Book 3, Page 515: Micahel Wall Sheriff. This 13th Day of June 1748. Miachel Wall Sherif made Oath before me that this is true copy taken for this County Given under my hand this day above written. Signed John Willis.. [Among many others ] Michael Young.

Deed Book 3, page 522: Indenture made the 3rd day of November, 1748, between John Davis of Cumberland Parrish, Lunenburgh County, and Buckner Stith, for 115 pounds, conveying 480 acres, on South side of Sturgeon Run, and being part of a larger tract granted to the said John Davis and Baxter Davis by Letters of Patent bearing date of September 28, 1728. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young, Henry Embry, Jr., and Thomas Sadler. Acknowledged in Court on January 5, 1748..

Deed Book 3, page 537: Indenture made the 4th day of January, 1748, between Robert Gee and Nathaniel Harrison, for 37 pounds and 10 shillings, conveying 413 acres, adjoining land of Lanier, Read, Harwell and Lloyd, and being part of land granted to the said Robert Gee by Letters of Patent bearing date of January 12, 1746 (MDCCXXXVI). Witnesses were M. Cadet Young, Hervy [Henry?] Morris, and William Morris. Acknowledged in Court on March 2, 1748.

Deed Book 3, Page 537: Indenture made 4 January 1748, between Robert Gee of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and Nathaneil Harrison of same. £37-10 Shillings, on South side of Sturgeon Runn, 413a. Signed Robert Gee. Witnesses: M. Cadet Young, Henry Morris, William Morris. Court March 2, 1748, Indenture and memorandum acknowledged by Robert Gee.

Indenture made the 3rd day of November, 1748, between John Davis of Cumberland Parrish, Lunenburgh County, and Buckner Stith, for 115 pounds, conveying 480 acres, on South side of Sturgeon Run, and being part of a larger tract granted to the said John Davis and Baxter Davis by Letters of Patent bearing date of September 28, 1728. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young, Henry Embry, Jr., and Thomas Sadler. Acknowledged in Court on January 5, 1748. DeedBook 3, page 522.

Deed Book 3, Page 570. Ralph Dunkley of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County held firmly bound unto George Clayton of same, in sum of £80, dated 1 June 1749. Condition of obligation that if Ralph Dunkley shall make over in open court by good & lawfull deeds or other conveyance a tract of land lying on the Ridge between Waqua & Sturgeon Run and adjoining the lines of the said Clayton, Fisher & Griffin or otherwise to Return the Survey into the Secretary Office in the said George Claytons name when required then obligation to be void. Signed Ralph Dunkley. Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Richd. Vaughan (bhm). Court June 1, 1749, Bond acknowledged by Ralph Dunkley.

Deed Book 3, Page 621: Indenture made 16 December 1749, between Charles Clanton of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and Thomas Clanton of same, £20, 213a. Signed Charles Clanton (bhm). Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Richard Hyde (bhm). Court December 26, 1749, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by Charles Clanton.

Brunswick Co., VA. Will Book 3, p. 19: Will of Sterling Clack of St. Andrews Parish, , will Jan. 1750, proved on 26 March 1751 by Michael Cadet Young and other witnesses, Henry Morris and Clack Courtney. (The Family Chronicle and Kinship Book, Bond, Octavia Zollicoffer, Nashville, Tenn. McDaniel Print. Co.1928, pp. 618, 619.)

Deed Book 4, Page 171: Indenture made this 26 June 1750, between Samuel Dispain of Brunswick County, and Samuel Marshall of same, £30, 200a, on S side of Maherrin River that was granted to the said Samuel Dispain by Letters Patent dated 20 August 1748. Signed Samuel Dispain (bhm). Wit: Andrew Metcalfe, Anthony Metcalfe, M Cadet Young. Court 26 June 1750, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by Samuel Dispain.

Deed Book 5, page 22: Indenture made the 26th day of March, 1751, between Hezekiah Thrower of the Johnston County, North Carolina, and Joseph Wrenn of Surry County, Virginia, for 37 pounds, conveying to Hezekiah Thrower, 195 acres beginning at upper Fork of the first Great Creek above Christianna Fort, granted to John Ray, by patent bearing date of October 16, 1727. Witnesses were M. Cadet Young and Thomas Jackson. Presented in Court on March 26, 1751.

Deed Book 5, Page 118: Indenture made 29 March 1751, between George Clayton of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and William Rawlings of same, £30, 202a, being the same formerly granted to the said George Clayton by Letters Patent dated 20 August 1748. Signed George Clayton. Wit: William Harrison, M. Cadet Young, Theo Burk. [Theophilus Burk] Court 25 September 1751, Indenture acknowledged by George Clayton.

Deed Book 5, Page 107: Indenture made 25 September 1751 between Thomas Alstine of Surry County, Ship Carpenter and Thomas Singleton of Brunswick County, £80-8 Shillings, 804a, on South side of Totero Creek and being part of a Larger Tract formerly granted by Letters Patent to Henry Harrison Esqr. late of Huntington decd. and by him in his Lifetime conveyed to the said Thomas Alstine as by deed for that purpose in the records of this County may more largely appear. Signed Thomas Allstin. Wit: Lemuel Cocke, Randall Bracey, M Cadet Young. Court 25 September 1751, Indenture and memorandum acknowledged by Thomas Austine.

Brunswick Co., VA DB 5 p 161-2: 26 Sept 1751 Thomas Singleton of St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick Co., VA to Richard Cordel of Parish of Brandom and County of Prince George, Virginia for 40 lbs, 100 acres on south side of Totero creek, "beginning at a small hickory in the old line thence south 47 degrees 320 poles to a corner between several trees chopped inwards and thence N 68 degrees West 180 poles to a black jack in the old line thence along the old line 202 poles to a small white stake on
the road thence along the old line NE 84 poles to the beginning, the 400 acres of land being part of a larger tract which the said Thomas Singleton purchased lately of Thmas Allston of Surry Co., VA. Wit: Geo. Clayton, M. Cadet Young, Benjamin Harrison Signed: Thomas Singleton, Judith Singleton
Rec'd 31 March 1752

Deed Book 5, Page 143: Indenture made 1 January 1752, between Hinchia Mabry the Elder of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and Anne his wife, and Clack Courtney of same, Chyrurgeon, £150, 578a, on both sides of Stoney Hill Run, as in and by a Patent dated 5 July last past granted to the said Anne by the name of Anne Courtney. Signed Hinchey Mabry (bhm), Anne Mabry. Receipt witnessed by M Cadet Young. Court 1 January 1752, Indenture acknowledged by Hinchia Mabry and Anne his wife; receipt acknowledged by the said Hinchia, previous to which Anne was privily examined.

Deed Book 4, page 86: Daniel Mackneel purchased 200 acres on 26 Oct 1753 from Drury Stith, Henry Morris and Michael Cadet Young of Brunswick Co.

"Record of acknowlegment by T. Field (spelled ffeild here) that he has received from Buckner Stith an assignment of George and Robert Austin's n (?) bond to him dated 9 April, 1755, whereon is due 63 pounds, 17s and 1d. which said money is received on a mortgage made ...... since contracted by Michael Cadet Young to Theophilus Field the 27 March, 1753. On a tract of land in Brunswick County containing 882 acres ... dated 17 June, 1755, and recorded 24 June, 1755." <stith.packent.com/aunt_estie/letters/19610221.html>

Book 7, Page 16: Indenture made the 9th day of September, 1761, between Richard Vaughan, the Younger, and John Westmoreland, for 32 pounds, conveying 63 acres and 3 quarters, on South side of Wagua Creek and on both sides of Beaverpond Branch, and being part of a larger tract of 250 acres formerly granted to Richard Vaughan, the elder, by Letters Patent and was by a clause in the Last Will and Testament of the said Richard Vaughan bequeathed the 250 acres to his two grandsons, Richard Vaughan and Abraham Vaughan, to be equally divided between them and that the division be made across the Beaver Pond Branch, the half of which division on the North side of the said Branch is hereby gargained and sold on the North side of the same. Signed by Richard Vaughan (his mark). Witnesses were Thomas Butler and M. Cadet Young. Indenture and Memorandum of Livery of Seizin were acknowledged in Court on September 28,1761, by Richard Vaughan. Deed.

Brunswick Will Book 4, pt.2
227 (323) Will of Amy Gilliam 30 Nov 1760, 28 March 1763. Witnessed by Mychaile Cadle [sic] Young, Mary Vaughn, William Vaughn. Proved by Michaiel Cadle [sic] Young , 28 March 1763.

* * * *
MCY Letters:
Here are transcriptions of the four letters in the Kennedy Collection written by Michael Cadet Young

Michael Cadet Young Letter February 1st, 1767, to Thomas Young [Copy of original in paper file.]

My son,
I wish you joy of your fourth daughter which it has pleased God to send you, and I hope that Judith will have a good time of it and that she will get well again after the difficulties of child bearing. Nod [apparently a slave] tells me that you and yours are well excepting his mistress’s condition which God grant may be to her and your comfort.

I sent you by Capt. Stith a note to ?? Mr. Taylor or his deputy to give you my order for attendance as a witness between Stith and Cordbreath [?] and I had expected that when Nod came down that you had sent it by him, but it seems you did not: I am in great need of the same for I expect now an prosecution against me daily for a debt which I thought I had clear of and was accepted on Co. Stith’s hands, but contrary to that, I was served with a Scire Facias to renew the judgment in order to run me to an [?] charge which I am determined never [to] pay as there was an assumption on the one hand and an acceptance on the other . If you have not been to the office[?] the order, pray mighty god [obscure words] your affairs will admit and [?] you [your?] [?] come and you send it by him; In the mean time, if the Execution comes, I am resolved to go to prison and stay there as the law directs and swear myself out for you are sensible that what little is in the house and out of doors belongs to you and your brother John and sister, saving the mare saddle and cart which really is all the property I have.

Inclosed [sic] is a letter to Mr. Hudgin which beg you’ll give to him, it is to demand ten shillings of him at [?] for he owes me twenty more which is thirty in all and if it suits him to pay the whole I shall be glad to receive it, if not, ten will suffice for the present for I am in great need of that quantity of money and can’t tell what to do without it. I [give or grant] you and yours my blessing and am you affectionate father. M Cadet Young
Tuesday Morning February 1st, 1767
P.S. Mr. Hudgin lives at or near Coll. Garland

[My note: stapled to the copy of the letter I received was a note of debt to Thomas Young for four pounds, dated January 2, 1768. It was not signed and does not seem to belong with the letter, so I have not transcribed it as part of this letter.]

Michael Cadet Young Letter: “To Thomas Cadet Young on Crooked Creek, Lunenburgh County”

Thursday 2nd of June 1768
Son Thomas,
This day your Brother Legros intended for your House in order to proceed on his journey to the Congarees, but just before his departure from home your sister’s suitor Brock, arrived with his waggon [sic] from Petersburg and insisted on his staying this night, indeed myself and your mother required him to stay ‘till morning which upon our [?] he agreed to.

Mr. Brock seems to be very [?] on his courtship and by what I guess by her conduct [she? M?] has an inclination to him and to be fully satisfied of the man’s character, and way of living. Your mother [her?] self has desired your Brother Legros to call upon John Marshall and to make enquiry of him and others in the neighborhood about Brock and to know for certain the truth of his conduct and living, which you Brother is to acquaint me by a letter. But I think it would be much better if your business could permit it, that you would take [?] with your Brother as far as Fishing Creek to be satisfied [?]: For various are the reports concerning him. Some saying that he is a married man and others that he is not, and that his wagon and team are his own property, if so considering the misfortunes your poor sister has had it will be a tolerable match for her, but if it be otherwise, she must wait longer to better her self.

[The next section seems to have been written later. Most of the first sentence, and perhaps more, is missing. ]
When I came …. after [?] stay, I [?] over to Capt. Buchner Stitth’s to keep house for them that night while they were gone to Capt. ??mmon’s to a Coit Play and when I returned in the morning was agreeably surprised with the [?] of your brother who was come back from his journey to a [several words obscure] of the character of Brock who is such a base scoundrel Your Brother went to [see?] John Marshall who informed him that the base intruder was a married man that he has a wife and two children [words obscure] that they wo?? [his?] habits with papers for such; that he, the said Brock, is a drunken worthless fellow; that he owes to one Mr. Parks for whom he waggons for at least sixty or seventy pounds; that he is so dishonest that Marshal was afraid to trust him with his tobbo [tobacco] when he waggoned it to the Point; that it is expected that he will run away soon and that he is so much in debt that it is impossible for him soon to get out of it and in short that he is a very roguish knave. These tidings from your kind brother came very opportunely to prevent the misery and shame your sister would by this rogue’s insinuations have been brought to, if not thus timely prevented. I am resolved if ever he comes again (or any such) not to suffer him to stay in my house and to sharply reprimand him for his wicked designs.

[There seems to be a missing piece to the letter because the first sentence in the following section does not fit with the last sentence in the previous section.]
toward his sister in preventing this [?] delusion’s taking effect upon her and has advised her for the future to be very cautious of all strangers, and indeed of every man who pretends to offer their humble service to her, and not to give anyone too much liberties, but to keep them off at proper distance ‘till she knows in the first place what they are and secondly if they are upon honorable forms and lastly if they are sincerely and affectionately bent upon matrimony; and if so, then not to give her suitor no more liberties than modesty will bear and [?] require. With this advice he took his leave of her and his Mother on the Monday following, and then came to me who was in the corn-field and bad me farewell and proceeded on his journey again the second time.

I hope that you and Judith and Children are all well which is the desire of your affectionate father. M. Cadet Young.

[My note on the following letter: Given what appears to be “X” in the month and MCY’s reference to the “Holydays,” I think this letter was written in December of 1769. Although most sources say that he died in 1769, I think the letter in which he asked TCY to care for TCY’s mother in her old age, was written after this letter. This would probably mean that MCY died early in 1770. I believe the cover of this letter is addressed to “Mr. Thomas Young, factor of John Bennet.” This raises additional questions about the wealth of the Young family.]

Michael Cadet Young Letter December 1769

Son Thomas,
I commend you for your industry and care in advancing your self and making provision for your family, but in the mean time, you are undutiful to me who thro’ God is the author of your being here. You are sensible of the low station of health I am in, which if you had that filial duty in you as a son should have for his father must give you some anxiety considering that I got this lingering ailment in riding early and late in the tending upon you in your late sickness and that it was thro’ my care and blessing of God that you mended from your dangerous illness. But for all my care and [?] I am forgot and neglected by you. It is as [?] you could have done, at least in this Holyday times either to have sent or come yourself to know how your aged father was which you undoubtedly would have done if I had an estate to leave behind me, but as I have nothing, I am dispised and forgot.

You promised me at your unfortunate brother’s funeral that you would take an assignment of Wicked Ralph’s bond [?? Ralph Dunkley?? Ralph Hubbard??], and sue him to recover the contents of the same, which I want done as soon as possible, and make him know that I am not to be deceived any longer by his lies. I am not in a condition to attend a court so far distant from me, and supposed, as you are my son, that you would do that piece of service for me, if you will not and this is much trouble to you, I must apply to some other person that [has? tear in paper] charity in them and a fellow feeling. I am in great want of money to discharge what little [?] before I leave this world, and God knows how soon that may be, for I feel the lamp of life decaying every day; my breath grows shorter and shorter, so that I can’t sport myself the least as can be, not even walk but with great difficulty for the want of breath: I hope that you and your family are well which is the sincere desire of your affectionate father.
[Xber] the 22nd, 1769.

[My note on the following letter: I think this was one of the last letters MCY wrote. I suspect TCY responded to MCY’s 22 December 1769 letter with an immediate visit, but MCY didn’t use the occasion to discuss his own impending death. This letter followed shortly after the visit.]

Michael Cadet Young Letter -- Undated Probably late December 1769 or early January 1770.

Son Thomas,
When you and Judith were down to see me you was very desirous to know what I had to say to you before you left me, but seeing you somewhat [?] at my unhappy condition, I did refrain from opining my last sentiments to you; and gave you in [lieu thereof?] a paper for the regulation of your family for I knew very well that what I am now dictating would have set the whole family in fear. Now what I request at your hands is this, that you will take [?] care of your poor indigent mother and suffer her not to want in her old age [the next part is a bit obscured by what looks to be old scotch tape.] tho' a Child be ever So dutiful it never repays back the cares, troubles, and anxieties which parents undergo in the raising them to the state of manhood.

I should have recommended her to your brother Francis as your elder brother but poor Betty is such an infirm body that it would be very disagreeable and irksome to my poor old mate. Therefore my son I am in hopes that you will comply with the desires of your dying father who earnestly wishes you and yours well, by praying to God that he may [?] on all your just and honest undertakings; and may that same almighty pour down upon you his heavenly benediction is the hearty desire of your afflicted and affectionate dying father. M. Cadet Young


325. Temperance (YOUNG)

Prepared October 14, 2009, by Janice McAlpine, 2345 Oleander Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806. E-mail: macalpage@cox.net

Temperance, wife of Michael Cadet Young, born about 1712, probably in Virginia, died after 1782, probably in North Carolina or Tennessee.

Based on the birth of their first child in October 1731, I assume Temperance married Michael Cadet Young about 1730/1731. If she was 18 when she married, she would have been born about 1712/1713. It is possible that she actually was a little bit younger than 18 at the time of her marriage.

Temperance outlived her husband and, according to a letter dated April 16, 1782, from Legros Young to his brother Thomas, she was alive as late as February 1782. In his letter, LeGros reported, "David More and wife and our poor mother is living on the Wataugar [next word hard to read, perhaps River] I heard a trew acount of them from one of my neighbors, James Taylor, who saw them and is living on his plantation. He gives me a very good account of them. Left them on the furst [sic] of February last. Says that they were all well and lik’t [sic] their [word unreadable]" (Kennedy Collection, copy in paper file.)

There was a David Moore in the Watauga Territory early. Perhaps he was the same person mentioned in the letter. There is no explanation for why Temperance was with David More and no hint as to who he might have been. Did Temperance marry for a second time to David’s father? Was David a grandson? A brother? (Notes on David Moore below.)

For what it is worth, the only “More” I have found with any connection to MCY was in 1728 in Henrico County. On August 3, 1728, MCY witnessed a deed with Mark Moor and George Hunt Moore. (Henrico County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, pp. 195-196.)

Most on-line researchers list two wives for Michael Cadet Young, the first Martha Saddler/Sadler, whom he is said to have married abt 1723, and the second Temperance, whom he is said to have married abt. 1740. Martha is usually listed as the mother of sons Francis, Henry, William, James, Benjamin, Thomas and Legros. Temperance is only listed as the mother of Michael, Jr. This "information" comes from Walter Jorgensen Young's book , The Young Family of Bristol, (1937), but it does not fit with the facts.

Temperance is the only wife of whom we have any record. Temperance was listed as Francis Cadet Young’s mother in his 1731 birth record. (The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789, transcribed and published by Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne. Richmond, Va. 1898.) In a Brunswick Co., Virginia, deed dated 25 November 1755, Temperance Young relinquished her dower rights in land transferred by Michael Cadet Young Sr. to Buckner Stith. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Order Book 5, p. 503.) Michael Cadet Young, Jr.'s, 1762 will listed Temperance as “my mother Temperance Young.” (Brunswick Co., Virginia, Will Book 4, pt.2,198-(278) Will of Michael Young Jr. of St. Andrew's Parish 5 Feb. 1762, probate 22 March 1762.) There is absolutely no evidence that Michael Cadet Young married before about 1730 or that his wife was named Martha.

The primary source for the name “Martha” appears to have been Walter J. Young’s book. According to The Young Family of Bristol, p. 57, earlier family histories listed Temperance as Michael Cadet Young's only wife. See, e.g., Genealogy of the Cowles Families in America, Calvin D. Cowles, 1929, Vol. I. page 395, "[Temperance Young, daughter of Thomas Cadet Young, was] the granddaughter of Michael Cadet and Temperance (Sadler) Young of Brunswick Co., Virginia." Walter rejected this stating, "records show that Col. Thomas Saddler had a dau. named Martha, none named Temperance. Martha d. about 1740 at birth of Benjamin & Temperance was the second wife." (It is interesting to note that at page 6 in his book Walter Young says that Martha was the daughter of John Saddler, Gent. So much for consistency!)

Even though I am sure that Michael Cadet Young did not marry a Martha Saddler about 1723, there appears to have been a family relationship with Thomas Sadler and his wife Rebecca Featherstone. Thomas Sadler and Michael Cadet Young were listed together on a number of land transactions in Brunswick Co., VA and there are at least two letters in the Kennedy Collection that refer to Thomas and Rebecca Featherstone Sadler as "uncle and aunt" or “uncle and family.” One is the April 28, 1792, letter from William and Susannah Gill to Susannah’s father Thomas Cadet Young and step-mother Lucy. That letter says, “old uncle and aunt Sadler is well also but poor Featherston is in a low state of health. . . .” Featherstone was the son of Thomas Sadler and Rebecca Featherstone. (See separate notes on Thomas Sadler.)

The second letter was written by Temperance’s son John Young on December 10th 1792. It says, “I heard from uncle Sadler and his famaly [sic] some few weeks past. The old people are still alive. Featherston has something risen on his nose and is likely to kill him.” John’s letter is especially interesting because, if Thomas Sadler and Rebecca Featherstone were John’s uncle and aunt, they had to have been on the maternal side. So Temperance was likely either a Sadler or a Featherstone.

The Sadler family was Quaker and instrumental in forming new Quaker congregations in Brunswick County. Featherstone Sadler represented Ward’s Preparatory Meeting at Black Water Monthly Meeting in 1784, but was disowned in 1803 for involvement in slavery. (Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy (Hinshaw) vol. VI, Virginia, pp. 120, 140) Temperance was an unusual name in the South except in Quaker families. This is another indication that Temperance might have been a Sadler.

If I had to guess, I would say that Temperance and Thomas Sadler were siblings and that their father was named Thomas Sadler. MCY and Temperance named their first son Francis after his paternal grandfather, Francis. If MCY and Temperance followed standard naming patterns, their second son would have been named after his maternal grandfather. In this case, MCY and Temperance named their second son Thomas. In addition, Thomas Sadler (Jr?) named his first son Thomas, probably after the child’s paternal grandfather. Unfortunately, despite these clues, the Sadler connection remains pure speculation.

* * * *
For further investigation only:

1787 Wilkes Co NC Tax Lists
- Inhabitants Numbered in Capt. GORDON'S District [Wilkes County, NC]
Page 7
James Taylor 1 1 2 - -

Watauga River, 60 mi (97 km) long, rising in the Blue Ridge Mts., NW N.C., and flowing NW to the south fork of the Holston River near Kingsport, Tenn. . Settlement on the river began in 1768.

Elizabethton and Carter County, originally known as the Watauga Settlement, were first settled in 1769. Located on the Watauga River and centered around the Sycamore Shoals river crossing, this was the first of four permanent settlements located west of the Appalachian Mountains. Carter County was established in 1796 when Tennessee achieved statehood.

<http://www.geocities.com/qatballou_laura/history/history_tennessee_franklin_and_petitioners.htm>
State of Franklin Petitioners - 1787- From North Carolina State Records, Vol. 22, pp. 705-714.
List of residents of the State of Franklin who petitioned for release from all obligations, taxations, and duties to the North Carolina government: [among many others]
Alexander Moore, Anthony Moore, David Moore, Joseph Moore, Moses Moore, William Moore

HISTORICAL CHRONOLOGY JOHN D. CHISHOLM 1730-1794 <http://www.zianet.com/blove/Our%20Chisholm%20Legacy/Chronology.html>
Discusses the Watauga Settlement
September 18-21, 1795
Durham relates the commissioning of David Moore by John Chisholm to build a flat-bottomed river boat for Governor Blount to carry War Department goods from Knoxville to the Chickasaw and the Choctaw, and for Moore to pilot the boat. (9, p. 236)

<http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zlna&id=wbp005&_cc=1&_id=440bda93-1146080889-9479> Articles of agreement, 1794 Oct. 12, Knoxville, [Tennessee] / [signed by] David Moore and William Blount, Governor of Tennessee


352. John Lewis

http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?Neriah,Mary,Moss::lewis::12164.html
John Lewis had a lot of sons, big tough and many thought ruthless. It is said
people were afraid to confront these men. They were also hard working and
had many friends. There were stories handed down about the families and many
can be found in books in the Randolph County history at the Ashboro Library.


354. Benjamin BEESON Sr.

Family History: Southern Genealogies #1, 1600s-1800s
Historical Southern Families, Vol. XI, Beeson, Grubb, Boren, Bowles
and Related Families of England, Pennsylvania ..., Page 251

Benjamin Beeson, son of Richard and Charity (Grubb) Beeson, was b.
1/14/1714 at Chester Co., Pa., and 6/14/1794 in Guiford Co., N.C. He married
Elizabeth (Hunter?) in 1738 at Hopewell Monthly meeting, northern Virginia.
their daughter Jane was born 3/22/1760 in Guiford Co., and d. 1/9/1792. Jane
Beeson married 1/28/1778, John Bond, who was b. 5/30/1755, d. 1795, in
Guiford Co.
__________________________
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Farm/4038/Beeson.html

Benjamin Beeson married Elizabeth Hunter according to a tradition described in "The Bason-Beason-Beeson Mixup," by W. P. Johnson in North Carolina Genenalogy, Spring 1968. Two pewter platters that Elizabeth Hunter brought to America from England have been handed down in the Beeson family. Benjamin & Elizabeth Beeson had twelve children recorded in New Garden Monthly Meeting records:Isaac Beeson (12/26/1739); Benjamin Beeson (2/9/1741); William Beeson (11/11/1743); Frances Beeson (12/20/1744); Richard Beeson (3/11/1747); Ann Beeson (5/30/1749); Betty Beeson (7/30/1754); Edward Beeson (1/1/1757); Rachel Beeson (2/14/1759); Jane Beeson (3/22/1760); Mary Beeson (9/21/1762). Benjamin died 6/4/1794 in Randolph County, North Carolina, and is buried at Centre Monthly Meeting.

Read the notes in Charity Grubb's father John Grub. It comes from the following posting.
The posting by David N Grubb was found in the Grubb Genforum
http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-genforum/pageload.cgi?charity::grubb::165.html
It starts with the following;
THE GRUBB FAMILIES OF ENGLAND:
To members of the Delaware Grubb family, Judge Ignatius Cooper Grubb (1841 - 1927) of
the Delaware Court of Appeals is remembered for his disproved theory that the Delaware
family was descended from nobility. We now know that John Grubb, our immigrant ancestor
was not a member of the prominent Wiltshire Grubbe family, and that Frances, his wife was
not the daughter of Sir Henry Vane, "the younger." However, to genealogists of various Grubb
families throughout the world, Ignatius Grubb is recognized as the first modern family historian
who determined that the Grubb families of England are in fact transplants from Denmark and
Germany.
Ancestors of John Grubb (1652-1708)
Posted by: David N Grubb Date: May 07, 1999 at 13:24:45 of 291

The following will was obtained at the above website.

I Benjamin Beeson of Randolph county and State of North Carolina being advanced to old age
and calling to mind that it is appointed for all men once to die and now bing in but a poor
state of health but of a sound mind and memory thanks to the auther of all good for same, do
make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following, that is to say
first all of my just Debts and funeral charges to be paid by my Executors hereafter to be named.
First I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Elizabeth all my Personal Estate Except the
Cash notes during her widowhood, the house she now lives in, the barn and Building with one
half orchard and five or Six poles Round the Dwelling home to make her a garden with wood and
wather or as much as she Shall think best. Twenty five Bushels of bread stuff one fat hogg
every year During her widowhood and four or five of cleared land when she Shall think best if
she needs so much bread paid by my son Edward Beeson. 2nd at the end of her widowhood to be
Equally Divided Amongst my five sons Isaac, William, Richard, Edward and Benjamin. 3rd and lastly
at the end of my wifes widowhood all the Rest of my Movable Estate to be Equally divided
amongst all my children that is living (to wit) Isaac, Benjamin, William, Richard, Edward, Frances,
Ann, Charity, Betty, Mary. I do Constitute and Ordain my two sons Isaac & Edward Beeson
Executors of this my last will and testament and revoke all others heretofore by me made.

Signed Sealed and Delivered in the presents of us this 2nd day of the 4th Month 1794.

Benjamin (B) Beeson (seal) his mark

William Beeson
Henry Lamb
Benjamin Lamb


355. Elizabeth HUNTER

The age difference between Elizabeth and her parents makes it
impossible that her parents are Jacob Hunter and Sarah Hill
but who then? She could be Jacobs mother.
__________________________________
Family History: Southern Genealogies #1, 1600s-1800s
Historical Southern Families, Vol. XI, Beeson, Grubb, Boren, Bowles
and Related Families of England, Pennsylvania ..., Page 251

Benjamin Beeson, son of Richard and Charity (Grubb) Beeson, was b.
1/14/1714 at Chester Co., Pa., and 6/14/1794 in Guiford Co., N.C. He married
Elizabeth (Hunter?) in 1738 at Hopewell Monthly meeting, northern Virginia.
their daughter Jane was born 3/22/1760 in Guiford Co., and d. 1/9/1792. Jane
Beeson married 1/28/1778, John Bond, who was b. 5/30/1755, d. 1795, in
Guiford Co.
________________________________
The Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930
Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, Vol I, New Garden Monthly Meeting,
Page 490-1

Benj. & Elizabeth Beeson, cont
Ch: Isaac b. 12-26-1739 O.S.
Benj. " 2- 9-1741.
William ". 11-11-1743/4.
Frances ". 12-10-1744/5.
Richard " 3-11-1747.
Ann " 3-30-1749.
Charity " 8-25-1751.
Betty " 7-30-1754 N.S.
Edward " 1-1-1757.
Rachel " 2-14-1759.
Jane " 3-22-1760.
Mary " 9-21-1762.


356. Samuel MOSS

Posted By: Catherine Tenney
Email: tenney@quasar.fiber.net
Subject: Re: Looking for Samuel Moss 1739 N-HVN, CT
Post Date: September 24, 2000 at 14:23:58
Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/moss/messages/1752.html
Forum: Moss Family Genealogy Forum
Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/moss/

Here is a reference from Families of Ancient New Haven by Donald Lines
Jacobus: Samuel Moss and Mary Judd had the following children:
Susanna,
Hannah (b Oct 1737, d 21 Dec 1739,
Samuel (b 31 Mar 1739 d. 1739),
a male (b May 1741 d. 8 Aug 1752),
Joshua (b 18 Jun 1743),
Sarah (b 20 Apr 1745 who md Jonas Morgan) and
Thomas b. 17 --- 1747-8 d. 1 Feb 1749-50).
You might want to look in Early Families of Wallingford,
CT FHL 974.67/W3 D2d, p.250 to 256.
I do find Samuel Moss on the 1800 Census in Pendleton District, SC. He is
aged 45 and over as is the oldest female in the same household. There is 1 male
aged 10-16 and one female aged 16-26. Frankly, I'm wondering if the surname
should read MORSE not MOSS. In Elbert Co, GA deeds 1789-1792 Saml
MORSE is the grantor and Jno Julian MORSE the grantee. Wm MOSS is a
witness! By the way, I live in West Jordan. My gg grandmother married
Beason Lewis. Small world. I have the answer to your Lewis dilemma of
crossing the ocean. Honest!
______________
http://members.yournet.com/cscudder/scudder/pafg22.htm
Christopher E. Scudder
5404 Hickory Hills Lane
Harrison, Arkansas 72601
Tel: (870) 741-5845
Send e-mail to: cscudder@yournet.com

Samuel Moss Jr. 1 (Samuel Moss , Martha Lothrop , Elizabeth Scudder , John
Scudder , Henry Scudder , Thomas Scudder , John Scudder , John Scudder ,
Henry ) was born 4 Apr 1711. He died 11 Sep 1791.

Samuel married (1) Mary Judd 1 on 28 Oct 1734. Mary was born 2 Apr
1706. She died 28 Jan 1747/1748.

They had the following children:

922 F i Susanna Moss 1 was born 20 Oct 1735.
Susanna married Stanton 1 estimated 1755. Stanton was born estimated 1733.
923 F ii Hannah Moss 1 was born 31 Dec 1737. She died as a child.
924 M iii Samuel Moss 1 was born 31 Mar 1739. He died as a child.
925 iv Moss 1 was christened May 1741. Moss died 8 Aug 1752.
926 M v Joshua Moss 1 was born 18 Jan 1742/1743.
927 F vi Sarah Moss 1 was born 30 Apr 1745.
Sarah married Jonas Martin 1 estimated 1764. Jonas was born estimated 1743.
928 M vii Thomas Moss 1 was born 19 Jan 1747/1748.
He died 1 Feb 1747/1748.

Samuel also married (2) Hannah Royce 1 on 1 Nov 1748. Hannah was born
15 May 1720. She died 30 Nov 1797.

They had the following children:

+ 929 M viii Theophilus Moss
+ 930 M ix Thomas Moss
931 F x Mary Moss 1 was born 9 Apr 1753. She died 15 Dec 1836.
+ 932 F xi Martha Moss
933 F xii Bethia Moss 1 was born 21 May 1757.
934 F xiii Kezia Moss 1 was born 21 Dec 1762. She died 25 Aug 1824.

Source:
1. Soper, Edwin L., comp., Partial Genealogy of Descendants of Elizabeth
Scudder-E, Section I (Scudder Association Bulletin (Greenlawn, NY: by the
Association, 1981)), Bulletin XXX, p. 15, Jun 1981, Christopher Scudder,
5404 Hickory Hills Lane, Harrison, Arkansas 72601.
______________
The Ancestry of William Francis Joseph Boardman
Author: William F. J. Boardman
Call Number: R929.2 B662
This book contains the ancestry of William Francis
Joseph Boardman of Hartford, Connecticutt.
Bibliographic Information: Boardman, William F. J. The Ancestry
of William Francis Joseph Boardman. Harford, Connecticutt. 1906.

The ancestry of Susannah Hall is somewhat uncertain, but she is believed to
have been the daughter of Samuel Hall (No. 86) and Hannah Walker (No. 87).
According to her age at death she was born in 1684.

CHILDREN OF SAMUEL AND SUSANNAH MOSS.
I. Theophilus, b. Oct. 24, 1704; m. Apr. 13, 1738, Ruth Ranney.
II. Martha, b. June 7, 1706; m. Samuel Royce (Rice), of New Haven.
III. Susanna, b. Dec. 5, 1708; d.
Page 99

young.
IV. Samuel, b. Apr. 4, 1711; m. 1st, Oct. 28, 1734, Mary Judd, who d. Jan.
28, 1747-8; 2nd, Nov. 1, 1748, widow Hannah Doolittle.
V. Esther (No. 21).
VI. Isaac, b. Dec. 5, 1715; m. 1st, Hannah, who d. Mch. 31, 1731, ae. 40;
2nd, Oct. 4, 1736, Keziah Bowers.
VII. Sarah, b. Feb. 10, 1718; m. Jonathan Chapin of Hampshire Co., Mass.
VII. Isaiah, b. Oct. 16, 1720. IX. Keziah, m. Isaac Lewis of New Haven.
X. Bethiah, b. Mch. 2, 1723; m. John Canfield of Durham, and d. Oct.
17, 1782, in 58th year.
XI. Ebenezer, b. June 15, 1725; d. July 25, 1740. XII. Lois, b. Jan. 7, 1730;
m. David Cook, Jr., of New Haven.
___________________________
History of Wallingford, Conn: from its settlement in 1670 to the present
time, including Meriden, which was one of its parishes until 1806, and
Cheshire, which was incorporated in 1780
The author, Charles Henry Stanley Davis
Date Published: 1870
956 pages

page 859 - 863
17. SAMUEL.

Samuel Moss, son of Samuel and Susannah Moss, married 1st, Mary Judd,
May 28, 1734 ; she died, and he married 2d, Hannah , Jan. 28, 1748.

Children: 65 Susannah, b Oct. 20,. 1735, d Feb. 1, 1747 ; 66 Samuel,
b March 31, 1739 ; 67 Joshua, b Jan. 18, 1742 ; 68 Sarah, b April 30, 1745 ;
69 Thomas, b Jan. 21, 1747 ; 70 Thomas, b July 27, 1751 ; 71 Mary, b April 9,
1753; 72 Martha, b May 10, 1755 ; 73 Bethia, b May 21, 1757.


357. Mary JUDD

Connecticut, 1600s-1800s Local Families and Histories
Families of Early Hartford, CT, Surnames, I-J, Pages 343-344

Page 343
THOMAS JUDD
Thomas Judd s of Thomas & Sarah (Gaylord) born Mch 28, 1690 died Aug 24,
1724 (HTR) mar Jan 16, 1717-8 (HTR) Hepzibah Williams born Aug 2, 1696
(HTR) bp Oct 18, 1696 (1 Ch Rec) dau of James Williams & Sarah Richardson.
Thomas Judd Jr. and Hepzibah his wife ad full com W Hfd Ch Feb 15, 1719.
Children:
Sarah bp Aug 16, 1719 (W Hfd) dy
Sarah bp Aug 28, 1720 "
Hepzibah bp Oct 27, 1723 "
Thomas b 1726
Joseph Judd s of Thomas & Sarah (Gaylord) born Apl 21, 1701 died Feb 16,
1750 (Waterbury) mar Nov 18, 1726 (HTR) Elizabeth Royce of Wallingford who
died May 14, 1770 dau of Robert Royce.
Ebenezer Judd s of Thomas & Sarah (Gaylord) born Mch 3, 1703 died May 20,
1734 (HTR) mar Nov 5, 1729 (HTR) Hannah Richards born June 17, 1700
(HTR) bp June 23, 1700.

Brothers and sisters of Ebenezer Judd who m Hannah Richards.
est. dist. 1737
Thomas m Hepzibah Williams
Joseph m Elizabeth Royce
Sarah m James Williams
Joanna m William Scott
Elizabeth m Joshua How
Abigail m Joseph Hall
Mary m Samuel Moss
Rachel


358. George JULIAN

http://www.tngennet.org/bradley/b_julian.htm
GEORGE3 JULIAN (RENE2 ST. JULIEN, PIERRE OR RENE DE1) was born 01/03/1705-06 in Bohemia Manor, Cecil Co., Maryland, and died 09/1781 in Randolph, North Carolina. He married MARTHA DENTON Abt. 1728 in Cecil Co., Maryland.
Notes for GEORGE JULIAN: It is believed that George was injured in the battle at the Fort of Dorchester and died of his wounds there. He owned considerable land (both grants and purchased). He moved to Guilford, North Carolina in 1755. His land joined his brother, Issac's. At least two sons faught in the Rev. War. This George was a loyalist. Some records seem to state that his lands were confiscated for public use but others do not support this. "Estate not confiscated, but sold, 1788 by administrator Jacob Julian for George's heirs" In regards to his death:1/18/1782, Jemina Ponder'affadavit saith: She did live at the Creek Meeting House below Dorchester and that George Julian who did live on King's Creek in District aforesaid was there and she said despondant did see the said George Julian depart this life between the first and middle of September in the year 1781. Sources: land deeds, papers on file , S.C.Hist. Com., Columbia, S.C. More About GEORGE JULIAN: Fact 1: buried in the town of Julian near the border Fact 2: ders of Randolph and Guilford Counties Fact 3: Shiloh Cemetary Notes for MARTHA DENTON: Not much is known about Martha. Her name is on the deed (1758) in Frederick Co., Va. After George's death she married a man named Black.
Children of GEORGE JULIAN and MARTHA DENTON are:
16. i. JACOB4 JULIAN, b. Abt. 1730, Cecil Co., Md.; d. Abt. 1799, York County, South Carolina.
17. ii. GEORGE JULIAN, b. Abt. 1732, Cecil Co., Md.; d. Bef. 1800.
18. iii. RACHEL JULIAN, b. Abt. 1735, Cecil Co., Md.; d. Aft. 1830, Edgefield, S.C..
iv. JOHN JULIAN, b. Abt. 1736.
v. MARY JULIAN, b. Abt. 1738. 19.
vi. LEAH JULIAN, b. Unknown, Cecil Co., Md.; d. Abt. 1794, York Co., S.C..
vii. LYDIA JULIAN, b. Unknown. viii. RICHARD JULIAN, b. Unknown.


362. Henry HIESTAND

http://www.rootsweb.com/~takelley/hiestand/baker.htm
HIESTAND/HEISTON FAMILY OF PAGE
COUNTY, VIRGINIA

Heinrich Hiestand was the progenitor of the Hiestand/Heiston
Family of the Page County, Virginia area. Evidence suggests the
family was of Swiss origin, but may have moved to the German
Palatinate area prior to immigrating to North America, first living
in Pennsylvania and finally settling in the Shenandoah Valley of
Virginia. Heinrich Hiestand was a Mennonite (Anabaptist). Later
the Hiestands, as many other early Mennonite families of the
present Page County area, were converted by other religious
sects, often the Primitive Baptists. Although early Hiestand Family
information is available in both Switzerland and Germany,
researchers have been unable to connect Heinrich to a particular
Hiestand Family line there with a degree of certainty.

Heinrich Hiestand is reported to have been born on September
27, 1704, married around 1732, and died October 5, 1779, in
Shenandoah (now Page) County. His unnamed wife died January
12, 1777. On June 8, 1743, he purchased land in Orange (now
Page) County, Virginia. His children were Barbara, born c.
1736, married first Christian Harnish and secondly surname
Ross; Jacob, born c. 1734, drowned in 1795 in the South
Shenandoah River, married Marie Elizabeth Brumbach, who
with members of her family moved to Fairfield County, Ohio,
after Jacob's death; Peter, Sr., born February 18, 1738, died
February 10, 1812, given name of wife was Barbara, supported
the American cause in the Revolutionary War; Abraham, born c.
1740, married first Magdalene Boehm and secondly given
name Elizabeth, moved first to Washington County, Tennessee,
and later to Green and Barren Counties in Kentucky; Ann, born
October 15, 1742, died Kanawha County, (West) Virginia;
John, born c 1746, wife's given name was Elizabeth; Daniel,
born c 1750, married Christina Nave, September 28, 1773;
and Mary Magdalene, born c 1752, married Andrew Gimlin,
December 5, 1773, moved to Kentucky and lived in several
counties including Lincoln and Cumberland.

The descendants of Peter Hiestand, Sr. changed the family name
to Heiston. His children were Peter, Jr., born August 6, 1764,
died August 28, 1829 in Shenandoah (now Page) County,
married Barbara Huffman; Elizabeth, born c 1766, married
Benjamin Ruffner, moved to Fairfield County, Ohio, where she
died on January 20, 1820; Mary, born c 1774, married Andrew
Huffman; Anna, born c 1774, married Michael Bixler; and
Barbara, born c 1776, married Pierson Judd, died after 1840,
Page County.

Peter Heiston, Jr. purchased 250 acres of land located on the
east bank of Dry Run, east of present Beth Eden Lutheran
Church, in Shenandoah (now Page) County from John Moyers
on September 9, 1794. This tract, which was the eastern half of
the original Northern Neck Land Grant to James Murray, is still
owned in part by the Heiston Family. Peter, Jr. and Barbara
Huffman Heiston's children were Abraham, born c 1792,
married Frances Ellen Musselman and Mary Strickler, died
c 1846, Page County; Barbara, born January 5, 1797, died
January 14, 1882, Page County, unmarried; Susannah, born
April 28, 1808, died November 23, 1897, unmarried; John,
born October 7, 1798, married Isabel McCoy, moved to
Rockingham County, Virginia, where he died in October 1861;
Christina, born February 26, 1802, married Henry Moyer,
died February 16, 1883, Page County; Magdalena born c
1804, unmarried; Mary, born February 26, 1795, died January
7, 1859, Page County; and Henry, born December 2, 1810,
married Elizabeth Ellis, died February 9, 1880, Page County.